Skirmish of Arisaig

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Skirmish of Arisaig
Part of the Jacobite rising of 1745
Arisaig, view over Seideal na Ceapaich - geograph.org.uk - 918001.jpg
Arisaig Bay
Date17 May 1746 [1]
Location
Result Unknown
Belligerents
Union flag 1606 (Kings Colors).svg British-Hanoverians Jacobite Standard (1745).svg Jacobites
Clan Macdonald of Clanranald
Commanders and leaders
Union flag 1606 (Kings Colors).svg Captain Robert Duff [1]
Captain John Fergussone [1]
Jacobite Standard (1745).svgMacDonald of Borrodale [1]

The Skirmish of Arisaig took place on 16 May 1746 at Arisaig, Scotland and was the last armed conflict of the Jacobite rising of 1745. It was fought between a British Government force and Jacobites of the Clan Macdonald of Clanranald.

Arisaig settlement in the Highland region of Scotland

Arisaig is a village in Lochaber, Inverness-shire, on the west coast of the Scottish Highlands, within the Rough Bounds. It is also the traditional name for the part of the surrounding peninsula south of Loch Morar extending as far east as Moidart. The word Arisaig means "the safe place" in the Scottish Gaelic language. Arisaig is in the Scottish council area of Highland. It has a population of about 300.

Scotland Country in Northwest Europe, part of the United Kingdom

Scotland is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It covers the northern third of the island of Great Britain, with a border with England to the southeast, and is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean to the north and west, the North Sea to the northeast, the Irish Sea to the south, and more than 790 islands, including the Northern Isles and the Hebrides.

Jacobite rising of 1745 attempt by Charles Edward Stuart to regain the British throne for the exiled House of Stuart

The Jacobite rising of 1745, also known as the Forty-five Rebellion or simply the '45, was an attempt by Charles Edward Stuart to regain the British throne for his father, James Francis Edward Stuart. It took place during the War of the Austrian Succession, when the bulk of the British Army was fighting in mainland Europe, and proved to be the last in a series of revolts that began in 1689, with major outbreaks in 1708, 1715 and 1719.

Contents

Background

After the Jacobite defeat at the Battle of Culloden in April 1746, the Western Highlands of Scotland received attention from the British Royal Navy. [1] Captain John Fergussone of the Royal Navy had sailed north in the bomb vessel HMS Furnace through the Sea of the Hebrides and The Minch, and had come under fire from the Jacobites in what is now known as the Skirmish of Loch Ailort on 9 May 1746. [1]

Battle of Culloden Final confrontation of the Jacobite rising of 1745

The Battle of Culloden was the final confrontation of the Jacobite rising of 1745. On 16 April 1746, the Jacobite forces of Charles Edward Stuart were decisively defeated by Hanoverian forces commanded by William Augustus, Duke of Cumberland, near Inverness in the Scottish Highlands.

Royal Navy Maritime warfare branch of the United Kingdoms military

The Royal Navy (RN) is the United Kingdom's naval warfare force. Although warships were used by the English kings from the early medieval period, the first major maritime engagements were fought in the Hundred Years' War against the Kingdom of France. The modern Royal Navy traces its origins to the early 16th century; the oldest of the UK's armed services, it is known as the Senior Service.

Sea of the Hebrides A portion of the North Atlantic Ocean, off the coast of western Scotland

The Sea of the Hebrides is a portion of the North Atlantic Ocean, located off the coast of western Scotland, separating the mainland and the northern Inner Hebrides islands from the southern Outer Hebrides islands. To the north, the Sea of the Hebrides joins The Minch.

On 16 May 1746, the British naval expedition acquired a new force when HMS Furnace was joined by another bomb vessel, HMS Terror. [1] Fergussone then came under the command of Robert Duff who was the senior captain. [1] The next day, 17 May, Duff and Fergussone launched a joint expedition against Morar. [1] Their sailors landed on the western end of the beach and burnt the house of Alan MacDonald. [1]

HMS Terror was a 14-gun bomb vessel launched in 1741 and sold in 1754.

Robert Duff (Royal Navy officer) Royal Navy admiral

Robert Duff was an officer of the Royal Navy during the War of the Austrian Succession, the Seven Years' War and the American War of Independence. He rose to the rank of Admiral, and served briefly as colonial governor of Newfoundland.

Morar Village in the Highland region of Scotland

Morar is a small village on the west coast of Scotland, 3 miles (5 km) south of Mallaig. The name Morar is also applied to the northern part of the peninsula containing the village, though North Morar is more usual. The coastline of the area forms part of the Morar, Moidart and Ardnamurchan National Scenic Area, one of 40 such areas in Scotland, which are defined so as to identify areas of exceptional scenery and to ensure its protection by restricting certain forms of development.

Skirmish

After Morar, the vessels turned south, rounding the peninsula and arriving off Arisaig. [1] As the boats approached MacDonald of Borrodale's men opened fire on them and also exploded three French gunpowder mines when the sailors reached the shore. [1]

Aftermath

In response Duff and Fergussone retaliated by burning all of the houses along the loch. [1] On 27 May 1746, Furnace and Terror embarked with eighty regular troops from Fort William along with 120 men of the Campbell of Argyll Militia. [2] On 28 May this combined force made its way to Strontian where Duff and Fergussone left the coastal settlement of Moidart in flames. [2] On 30 May they anchored off the Isle of Eigg where Captain John MacLeod and forty men of the Jacobite Clan Ranald Regiment were lured by false promises to surrender only for thirty-eight of them to be confined on ship, some of whom died on voyage to the River Thames and the rest destined to become slaves in the West Indies. [2] Fergussone then posted detachments around Loch Morar and on the night of the 4/5 June 1746 one of his parties captured the Jacobite Simon Fraser, 11th Lord Lovat, a major prize. [2]

The Campbell of Argyll Militia also known as the Campbell militia, the Argyll militia, or the Argyllshire men, was an irregular militia unit formed in 1745 by John Campbell, 4th Duke of Argyll to oppose the Jacobite rising of 1745.

Strontian human settlement

Strontian is the main village in Sunart, an area in western Lochaber, Highland, Scotland, on the A861 road. Prior to 1975 it was part of Argyllshire. It lies on the north shore of Loch Sunart, close to the head of the loch. In the hills to the north of Strontian lead was mined in the 18th century and in these mines the mineral strontianite was discovered, from which the element strontium was first isolated.

Moidart is part of the remote and isolated area of Scotland, west of Fort William, known as the Rough Bounds. Moidart itself is almost surrounded by bodies of water : Loch Shiel cuts off the eastern boundary of the district, and continues along part of the southern edge; the remainder of the southern edge is cut off by Loch Moidart; the north is cut off by Loch Morar and Loch Ailort.

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 Duffy, Christopher (2007). The '45, Bonnie Prince Charlie and Untold Story of the Jacobite Rising. p. 532. ISBN   978-0-7538-2262-3.
  2. 1 2 3 4 Duffy. p.533.

See also

Skirmish of Loch nan Uamh

The Skirmish of Loch nan Uamh was a conflict that took place on 2 May 1746 and was part of the Jacobite rising of 1745. It was fought by the British Royal Navy against French privateers who were supporting the Jacobite rebels.

Skirmish of Loch Ailort

The Skirmish of Loch Ailort was a conflict that took place on 9 May 1746 at Loch Ailort, in the district of Moidart, Scottish Highlands and was part of the Jacobite rising of 1745.