Soviet Union men's national water polo team

Last updated
Soviet Union
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg
Association Федерация водного поло СССР
Confederation LEN (Europe)
FINA code URS
Olympic Games
Appearances 9 (first in 1952 )
Best result
World Championships
Appearances 6 (first in 1973 )
Best result
World Cup
Appearances 6 (first in 1979 )
Best result

The Soviet Union men's national water polo team represented the Soviet Union in international water polo competitions. After the dissolution of the Soviet Union, the Russian national water polo team became the successor of Soviet team.

Soviet Union 1922–1991 country in Europe and Asia

The Soviet Union, officially the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR), was a socialist state in Eurasia that existed from 30 December 1922 to 26 December 1991. Nominally a union of multiple national Soviet republics, its government and economy were highly centralized. The country was a one-party state, governed by the Communist Party with Moscow as its capital in its largest republic, the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic. Other major urban centres were Leningrad, Kiev, Minsk, Alma-Ata, and Novosibirsk.

Water polo ballgame-team sport played in water by teams competing to put the ball into the opponents goal

Water polo is a competitive team sport played in the water between two teams. The game consists of four quarters in which the two teams attempt to score goals by throwing the ball into the opposing team's goal. The team with the most goals at the end of the game wins the match. Each team is made up of six field players and one goalkeeper. Except for the goalkeeper, players participate in both offensive and defensive roles. Water polo is typically played in an all-deep pool meaning that players cannot touch the bottom.

Dissolution of the Soviet Union Process leading to the late-1991 breakup of the USSR

The dissolution of the Soviet Union occurred on 26 December 1991, officially granting self-governing independence to the Republics of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics (USSR). It was a result of the declaration number 142-Н of the Supreme Soviet of the Soviet Union. The declaration acknowledged the independence of the former Soviet republics and created the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), although five of the signatories ratified it much later or did not do so at all. On the previous day, 25 December, Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev, the eighth and final leader of the USSR, resigned, declared his office extinct and handed over its powers—including control of the Soviet nuclear missile launching codes—to Russian President Boris Yeltsin. That evening at 7:32 p.m., the Soviet flag was lowered from the Kremlin for the last time and replaced with the pre-revolutionary Russian flag.

Contents

Results

Olympic Games

Final results for the water polo tournament at the 1924 Summer Olympics. All medals were decided by using the Bergvall system.

Final results for the water polo tournament at the 1928 Summer Olympics:

Final results for the water polo tournament at the 1932 Summer Olympics:

World Championship

The 1973 Men's World Water Polo Championship was the very first edition of the men's water polo tournament at the World Aquatics Championships, organised by the world governing body in aquatics, the FINA. The tournament was held from 1 to 9 September 1973, and was incorporated into the inaugural 1973 World Aquatics Championships in Belgrade, Yugoslavia.

The 1975 Men's World Water Polo Championship was the second edition of the men's water polo tournament at the World Aquatics Championships, organised by the world governing body in aquatics, the FINA. The tournament was held from 19 to 26 July 1975, and was incorporated into the 1975 World Aquatics Championships in Cali, Colombia.

The 1978 Men's World Water Polo Championship was the third edition of the men's water polo tournament at the World Aquatics Championships, organised by the world governing body in aquatics, the FINA. The tournament was held from 19 to 27 August 1978, and was incorporated into the 1978 World Aquatics Championships in West Berlin, West Germany.

FINA Water Polo World Cup

The 1979 FINA Men's Water Polo World Cup was the first edition of the event, organised by the world's governing body in aquatics, the International Swimming Federation (FINA). The event took place in Rijeka and in the Tašmajdan Swimming Pool in Belgrade, Yugoslavia.

The 1981 FINA Men's Water Polo World Cup was the second edition of the event, organised by the world's governing body in aquatics, the International Swimming Federation (FINA). The event took place in Long Beach, United States. The eight participating teams played a round robin to decide the second ever winner of what would be a bi-annual event until 1999.

The 1983 FINA Men's Water Polo World Cup was the third edition of the event, organised by the world's governing body in aquatics, the International Swimming Federation (FINA). The event took place in Malibu, United States. The eight participating teams played a round robin to decide the winner of what would be a bi-annual event until 1999.

Player statistics

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