Water polo at the 1988 Summer Olympics

Last updated

Water polo
at the Games of the XXIV Olympiad
Venue Jamsil Indoor Swimming Pool
Dates21 September – 1 October 1988
Competitors156 from 12 nations
Medalists
Gold medal icon.svgFlag of SFR Yugoslavia.svg  Yugoslavia
Silver medal icon.svgFlag of the United States.svg  United States
Bronze medal icon.svgFlag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
  1984
1992  

Water polo at the 1988 Summer Olympics as usual was part of the swimming sport, the other two being swimming and diving. They were not seen as three separate sports, because they all were governed by one federation FINA. Water polo discipline consisted of one event: the men's team competition.

Contents

In the preliminary round twelve teams were divided into two groups. The two best teams from each group (shaded ones) advanced to the semi-finals. The two numbers three and four played classification matches to determine places 5 through 8, with the earlier result taken with them. The rest of the teams also played classification matches to determine places 9 through 12. [1] [2]

Squads

Preliminary round

Group A

TeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany 55006037+2310
Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union 53116330+337
Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 53114833+157
Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 52034039+14
Flag of France.svg  France 51044354112
Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea 50051475610
Source: [ citation needed ]

Group B

TeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
Flag of the United States.svg  United States 54015640+168
Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia 54016038+228
Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 53114838+107
Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 52125043+75
Flag of Greece.svg  Greece 51044566212
Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China 50053468340
Source: [ citation needed ]

Final round

Semi finals

Bronze medal match

Final


Group D

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
5Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary 31202820+84
6Flag of Spain.svg  Spain 31112423+13
7Flag of Italy.svg  Italy 3111252503
8Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia 3102182792
Source: [ citation needed ]

Group E

PosTeamPldWDLGFGAGDPts
9Flag of Greece.svg  Greece 33003721+166
10Flag of France.svg  France 32013419+154
11Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China 3102252832
12Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea 30031947280
Source: [ citation needed ]

Final ranking

Gold medal icon.svg Flag of Yugoslavia (1946-1992).svg  Yugoslavia [1]
Silver medal icon.svg Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Bronze medal icon.svg Flag of the Soviet Union.svg  Soviet Union
4Flag of Germany.svg  West Germany
5Flag of Hungary.svg  Hungary
6Flag of Spain.svg  Spain
7Flag of Italy.svg  Italy
8Flag of Australia (converted).svg  Australia
9Flag of Greece.svg  Greece
10Flag of France.svg  France
11Flag of the People's Republic of China.svg  China
12Flag of South Korea.svg  South Korea

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 "HistoFINA – Water polo medalists and statistics" (PDF). fina.org. FINA. September 2019. p. 4. Archived (PDF) from the original on 14 August 2020. Retrieved 22 August 2020.
  2. "Water Polo at the 1988 Seoul Summer Games". Sports Reference. Archived from the original on 17 April 2020. Retrieved 8 December 2019.

Sources