Susan Brown (minister)

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Susan Brown
Moderator of the General Assembly
First Minister meets the Right Rev Susan Brown (46306007145) (cropped).jpg
Brown in 2019
Church Church of Scotland
In officeMay 2018 – May 2019
Predecessor Derek Browning
Successor Colin Sinclair
Other post(s) Chaplain-in-Ordinary (2012–present)
Orders
Ordination1985
Personal details
Born
Susan Marjory Attwell

(1958-12-12) 12 December 1958 (age 65)
Edinburgh, Scotland
NationalityBritish
Denomination Presbyterianism
Alma mater University of Edinburgh

Susan Marjory Brown (born 12 December 1958) is a Scottish Presbyterian minister. She is the minister at Dornoch Cathedral and Honorary Chaplain to the Queen in Scotland. She was the first woman to take charge of a cathedral in the United Kingdom. [1] [2]

Contents

Early life and education

Brown was born on 12 December 1958 in Edinburgh, Scotland. She was educated at Penicuik High School, a non-denominational school in Midlothian. She went on to study at the University of Edinburgh, graduating with a Bachelor of Divinity (BD) degree in 1981 and completing a Diploma in Ministry (DipMin) in 1983. [3]

Ministry

Brown served as an assistant minister at St Giles' Cathedral, Edinburgh from 1983 to 1985. Having been ordained in 1985, she served as minister of Killearnan Parish Church near Muir of Ord in Ross-Shire from 1985 to 1998. Since 1998, she has been minister of Dornoch Cathedral in Sutherland. [3] She officiated at the wedding of Madonna and Guy Ritchie in 2000. [4] She has additionally served as Chaplain-in-Ordinary to Queen Elizabeth II since 2010. [3]

On 9 October 2017, it was announced that she had been nominated as the next Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland. She took up the position in May 2018 and served until May 2019. [5]

Personal life

In 1981, Susan Attwell married Derek Brown, a fellow minister and hospital chaplain. [3] [6] Together they have two children: one daughter and one son. [3]

See also

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References

  1. "Thoroughly modern minister She is the first woman in charge of a cathedral, skates down the aisles, wraps children in toilet paper, and will be at the centre of attention at Madonna's wedding - oh, and she's a breath of fresh air in the Church o". The Herald . 16 December 2000. Retrieved 3 April 2018.
  2. Macdonald, Lesley Orr (1999). In good company: women in the ministry. Wild Goose Publications. p. 79. ISBN   978-1-901557-15-2 . Retrieved 6 April 2011.
  3. 1 2 3 4 5 "Brown, Very Rev. Susan Marjory". Who's Who 2020 . 1 December 2019. doi:10.1093/ww/9780199540884.013.U290218. ISBN   978-0-19-954088-4 . Retrieved 14 June 2020.
  4. Morton, Andrew (2 May 2002). Madonna. Macmillan. p. 313. ISBN   978-0-312-98310-9 . Retrieved 6 April 2011.
  5. "Madonna minister appointed as Church of Scotland Moderator". BBC News. 9 October 2017. Retrieved 11 October 2017.
  6. "New Church of Scotland moderator named as Rev Susan Brown". Premier Christian News. 9 October 2017. Retrieved 7 April 2021.
Religious titles
Preceded by Moderator of the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland
2018-2019
Succeeded by