Take Me to Paris

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Take Me to Paris
"Take Me to Paris" (1951).jpg
Claire Guibert & Albert Modley
Directed by Jack Raymond
Written by Max Catto
Produced byHenry Halstead
Starring
Cinematography James Wilson
Edited by Helen Wiggins
Music by Percival Mackey
Production
company
Byron Films
Distributed by Associated British-Pathé
Release date
1951
Running time
72 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

Take Me to Paris is a 1951 British comedy film directed by Jack Raymond and starring Albert Modley, Roberta Huby and Bruce Seton. [1] It was made at Walton Studios. [2]

Contents

Plot

Mr. Armstrong's racing stable is preparing to send one of its top horses to run in Paris's Maisons Lafitte, when the thoroughbred is unexpectedly injured. Its replacement is Thunderhead, a much lowlier animal, but favourite of jockey and stable lad, Albert. Meanwhile, two crooked stable hands plot to use the cross channel trip to smuggle forged bank notes in the horse's blanket. Their plans are foiled however, by Albert, who also manages to win the big race riding his favourite horse.

Cast

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References

  1. Chibnall & McFarlane p.41
  2. "Take Me to Paris (1950)".

Bibliography