Up to the Neck

Last updated

Up to the Neck
Directed by Jack Raymond
Produced by Herbert Wilcox
Written by Ben Travers
Starring Ralph Lynn
Winifred Shotter
Francis Lister
Music by Lew Stone
Cinematography Cyril Bristow
Production
company
Distributed by United Artists
Release date
1933
Running time
73 minutes
Country United Kingdom
Language English

Up to the Neck is a 1933 British comedy film directed by Jack Raymond and starring Ralph Lynn, Winifred Shotter and Francis Lister. [1] It was made at Elstree Studios. [2]

Comedy is a genre of film in which the main emphasis is on humour. These films are designed to make the audience laugh through amusement and most often work by exaggerating characteristics for humorous effect. Films in this style traditionally have a happy ending. One of the oldest genres in film, some of the very first silent movies were comedies, as slapstick comedy often relies on visual depictions, without requiring sound. When sound films became more prevalent during the 1920s, comedy films took another swing, as laughter could result from burlesque situations but also dialogue.

Jack Raymond (1886–1953) was an English actor and film director. Born in Wimborne, Dorset in 1886, he began acting before the First World War in A Detective for a Day. In 1921 he directed his first film and gradually he wound down his acting to concentrate completely on directing - making more than forty films in total before his death in 1953.

Ralph Lynn English actor

Ralph Clifford Lynn was an English actor who had a 60-year career, and is best remembered for playing comedy parts in the Aldwych farces first on stage and then in film.

Contents

Plot

Shy bank clerk Norman B. Good comes into a big inheritance and uses it to realise his ambition to be a theatre impresario. Falling for chorus girl April Dawne, he invests most of his money in an expensive show designed to make her a star. When the production is a disaster, Norman takes to the stage in a desperate bid to improve the play by playing the lead. His monocle and toothy grin win him raves as a comic genius (despite the fact that he was playing the role straight), and the show becomes a hit as a comedy.

Cast

Winifred Shotter British actress

Winifred Florence Shotter was an English actress best known for her appearances in the Aldwych farces of the 1920s and early 1930s.

Francis Lister British actor

Francis Lister was a British actor. He was married to the actresses Nora Swinburne (1924–32) and Margot Grahame (1934-36).

Reginald Purdell English actor and screenwriter

Reginald Purdell was an English actor and screenwriter who appeared in over 40 films between 1930 and 1951. During the same period he also contributed to the screenplays of 15 feature films, and had a brief foray into directing with two films in 1937.

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References

  1. "Up to the Neck (1933)".
  2. Wood p.80

Bibliography