General John Regan (1933 film)

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General John Regan
Directed by Henry Edwards
Written by George A. Birmingham (play)
Lennox Robinson
Produced by Herbert Wilcox
StarringHenry Edwards
Chrissie White
Ben Welden
Cinematography Cyril Bristow
Production
company
Distributed by Paramount British Pictures
Release date
1933
Running time
74 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
Language English

General John Regan is a 1933 British comedy film directed by Henry Edwards and starring Edwards, Chrissie White and Ben Welden. [1] It is an adaptation of the 1913 play General John Regan by George A. Birmingham. It was a quota film made at British and Dominion Studios, Elstree, for release by Paramount. [2]

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References

  1. BFI.org
  2. Chibnall p.272

Bibliography