Rookery Nook (film)

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Rookery Nook
"Rookery Nook" (film).jpg
Sheet music for featured song
Directed by Tom Walls
Produced by Herbert Wilcox
Written by W. P. Lipscomb
Ben Travers
Based onthe farce by Ben Travers
StarringTom Walls
Ralph Lynn
Winifred Shotter
Mary Brough
Cinematography Bernard Knowles
William Shenton
Edited by Maclean Rogers (uncredited)
Production
company
Distributed by Woolf & Freedman Film Service (UK)
MGM (US)
Release date
11 February 1930 (London) (UK)
21 June 1930 (US)
Running time
90 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish
Budget£14,000 [1]
Box office£150,000 (England) [1]

Rookery Nook is a 1930 film farce, directed by Tom Walls, with a script by Ben Travers. It is a screen adaptation of the original 1926 Aldwych farce of the same title. The film was known in the U.S. as One Embarrassing Night. [2]

Contents

The film was very successful at the box office and led to a series of filmed farces. [1] [3]

Synopsis

Rhoda Marley seeks refuge overnight from a tyrannical stepfather in the house of Gerald Popkiss. He is alone there, as his wife is away; fearing a scandal he attempts to conceal Rhoda's presence from nosy domestic staff and his in-laws, with the help of his cousin Clive. Eventually all is explained, Gerald and his wife are reconciled, and Clive pairs off with Rhoda.

Cast

Source: British Film Institute [4]

Cast members marked * were the creators of the roles in the original stage production. [5]

Production

The film was one of a very small number of productions made by Herbert Wilcox's British and Dominions Film Corporation in association with His Master's Voice ("The Gramophone Company", later EMI). [6] The film used the cast of the original stage production. [7] HMV terminated its association with British & Dominions in 1931 out of concern that the company's participation in producing comedy films such as Rookery Nook and Splinters would demean its corporate image, of which it was very protective during the early days of the Great Depression.

Reception

Rookery Nook was voted the best British movie of 1930. [8]

According to one report, it was the most popular British film in Britain over the previous five years. [9]

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 Wilcox, Herbert (1967). Twenty Five Thousand Sunsets. South Brunswick. p. 88.
  2. Ben Travers. "One Embarrassing Night (1930) - Trailers, Reviews, Synopsis, Showtimes and Cast". AllMovie. Retrieved 4 August 2014.
  3. "DIRECTOR-PLAYERS". The West Australian . L (9, 834). Western Australia. 5 January 1934. p. 3. Retrieved 27 August 2017 via National Library of Australia.
  4. "Rookery Nook", British Film Institute, accessed 14 February 2013.
  5. "Aldwych Theatre – Rookery Nook", The Times , 1 July 1926, p. 14.
  6. "SCREEN GOSSIP". Western Mail . XLIV (2, 273). Western Australia. 5 September 1929. p. 7. Retrieved 27 August 2017 via National Library of Australia.
  7. "MOVING PICTURES". The Australasian . CXXVIII (4, 246). Victoria, Australia. 24 May 1930. p. 15 (METROPOLITAN EDITION). Retrieved 27 August 2017 via National Library of Australia.
  8. "Sunshine Susie", The Daily News, 19 August 1933, p. 19
  9. "THE MOVIE WORLD". Bowen Independent . 26 (2195). Queensland, Australia. 6 December 1930. p. 7. Retrieved 27 August 2017 via National Library of Australia.

Related Research Articles

Ben Travers

Ben Travers CBE AFC was an English writer. His output includes more than twenty plays, thirty screenplays, five novels, and three volumes of memoirs. He is best remembered for his long-running series of farces first staged in the 1920s and 1930s at the Aldwych Theatre. Many of these were made into films and later television productions.

Tom Walls

Thomas Kirby Walls, known as Tom Walls, was an English stage and film actor, producer and director, best known for presenting and co-starring in the Aldwych farces in the 1920s and for starring in and directing the film adaptations of those plays in the 1930s.

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Mary Brough

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Herbert Wilcox Film producer and director from Britain

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Aldwych farce

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