The Flag Lieutenant (1932 film)

Last updated

The Flag Lieutenant
Directed by Henry Edwards
Written by Leo Tover (play)
W.P. Drury (play)
Joan Morgan
Produced by Herbert Wilcox
Starring Henry Edwards
Anna Neagle
Joyce Bland
Peter Gawthorne
CinematographyStanley Rodwell
Edited by Michael Hankinson
Music byHarris Weston
Production
company
Distributed by Woolf and Freedman
Release date
12 October 1932
Running time
85 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
Language English

The Flag Lieutenant is a 1932 British war film based on the play by William Price Drury and directed by and starring Henry Edwards, Anna Neagle, Joyce Bland, and Peter Gawthorne. The film's plot involves a lieutenant who is wrongly accused of cowardice. [1]

Contents

Production

The film was made at British and Dominions Imperial Studios, Elstree. It is based on the play of the same title which had previous been adapted into films in 1919 and 1927. The film provided an early leading role for Neagle, who was under contract to the producer Herbert Wilcox and would later become his wife.

Cast

Related Research Articles

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Anna Neagle</span> English stage and film actress and singer

Dame Florence Marjorie Wilcox, known professionally as Anna Neagle, was an English stage and film actress, singer and dancer.

<i>Good Morning, Boys</i> 1937 British film

Good Morning, Boys! is a 1937 British comedy film directed by Marcel Varnel and featuring Will Hay, Graham Moffatt, Martita Hunt, Lilli Palmer and Peter Gawthorne. It was made at the Gainsborough Studios in Islington.

<i>Odette</i> (1950 film) 1950 British film

Odette is a 1950 British war film based on the true story of Special Operations Executive French agent, Odette Sansom, living in England, who was captured by the Germans in 1943, condemned to death and sent to Ravensbrück concentration camp to be executed. However, against all odds she survived the war and testified against the prison guards at the Hamburg Ravensbrück trials. She was awarded the George Cross in 1946; the first woman ever to receive the award, and the only woman who has been awarded it while still alive.

Herbert Wilcox Film producer and director from Britain

Herbert Sydney Wilcox CBE was a British film producer and director.

<i>They Flew Alone</i> 1942 British film

They Flew Alone is a 1942 British biopic about aviator Amy Johnson directed and produced by Herbert Wilcox and starring Anna Neagle, Robert Newton and Edward Chapman. It was distributed in the UK and the US by RKO Radio Pictures.

<i>Goodnight, Vienna</i> 1932 film

Goodnight, Vienna is a 1932 British musical film directed by Herbert Wilcox and starring Jack Buchanan, Anna Neagle and Gina Malo. Two lovers in Vienna are separated by the First World War, but are later reunited.

The Blarney Stone is a 1933 British comedy film directed by and starring Tom Walls. It also features Anne Grey, Robert Douglas, Zoe Palmer and Peter Gawthorne. The screenplay concerns a penniless Irishman who becomes the business partner of an English aristocrat with a penchant for high-stakes gambling.

<i>Limelight</i> (1936 film) 1936 British film

Limelight is a 1936 British musical film directed by Herbert Wilcox and starring Arthur Tracy, Anna Neagle and Jane Winton. It was released in the U.S. as Backstage.

<i>Bitter Sweet</i> (1933 film) 1933 film

Bitter Sweet is a British musical romance film directed by Herbert Wilcox and released by United Artists in 1933. It was the first film adaptation of Noël Coward's 1929 operetta Bitter Sweet. It starred Anna Neagle and Fernand Gravey, with Ivy St. Helier reviving her stage role as Manon. It was made at British and Dominion's Elstree Studios and was part of a boom in operetta films during the 1930s.

<i>Sixty Glorious Years</i> 1938 British film

Sixty Glorious Years is a 1938 British colour film directed by Herbert Wilcox. The film is a sequel to the 1937 film Victoria the Great.

Leave It to Smith is a 1933 British comedy film directed by and starring Tom Walls. It also featured Carol Goodner, Anne Grey, Peter Gawthorne and Basil Radford. It is also known as Just Smith.

<i>Dirty Work</i> (1934 film) 1934 British film

Dirty Work is a 1934 British comedy crime film directed by Tom Walls and starring Ralph Lynn, Gordon Harker, Robertson Hare and Basil Sydney. It was based on Dirty Work, one of the Aldwych Farces, by Ben Travers, which had some of the same cast members. The film was made at the Lime Grove Studios with sets designed by the art director Alfred Junge.

<i>The Crouching Beast</i> 1935 British film

The Crouching Beast is a 1935 British war thriller film directed by Victor Hanbury and starring Fritz Kortner, Wynne Gibson and Richard Bird. It was shot at Welwyn Studios with sets designed by the art director Duncan Sutherland. Based on the novel Clubfoot by Valentine Williams, the film was distributed by the Hollywood studio RKO Pictures in order to fulfil its British quota. However it was considerably more expensive than many of the quota quickies produced by American companies during the era.

<i>Flying Fifty-Five</i> 1939 British film

Flying Fifty-Five is a 1939 British sports-drama film directed by Reginald Denham and starring Derrick De Marney, Nancy Burne, Marius Goring, John Warwick and Peter Gawthorne. It was made by Admiral Films at Welwyn Studios. The film is based on a 1922 novel of the same name by Edgar Wallace which had previously been made into a 1924 silent film The Flying Fifty-Five.

Admirals All is a 1935 British comedy film directed by Victor Hanbury and starring Wynne Gibson, Gordon Harker, Anthony Bushell and George Curzon. It was based on the 1934 play of the same title by Ian Hay and Stephen King-Hall.

<i>The School for Scandal</i> (1930 film) 1930 film

The School for Scandal is a 1930 British historical comedy film directed by Thorold Dickinson and Maurice Elvey and starring Basil Gill, Madeleine Carroll and Ian Fleming. It is the first sound film adaptation of Richard Brinsley Sheridan's play The School for Scandal. It is also the only feature-length film shot using the unsuccessful Raycol colour process, and marked the screen debut of Sally Gray. The film was shot at the Elstree Studios of British International Pictures with sets designed by the art director Lawrence P. Williams. It ended up being released as a second feature and is classified as a quota quickie.

The Little Damozel is a 1933 British romance film directed by Herbert Wilcox and starring Anna Neagle, James Rennie and Benita Hume. It is based on the 1908 play by Monckton Hoffe, previously filmed in 1916. The screenplay concerns a captain who pays one of his sailors to marry a woman who works in a nightclub. Dresses for the film were designed by Doris Zinkeisen.

The Flag Lieutenant is a 1926 British war film directed by Maurice Elvey and starring Henry Edwards, Lilian Oldland and Dorothy Seacombe. It is based on the play The Flag Lieutenant by W.P. Drury. Its sets were designed by the art director Andrew Mazzei. The film proved to be one of the hits of the year at the British box office.

The Barton Mystery is a 1932 British crime film directed by Henry Edwards and starring Ursula Jeans, Ellis Jeffreys and Lyn Harding. It was based on the play The Barton Mystery by Walter C. Hackett.

The Further Adventures of the Flag Lieutenant is a 1927 British silent action film directed by W. P. Kellino and starring Henry Edwards, Isabel Jeans and Lilian Oldland.

References

Bibliography