Paddy the Next Best Thing (1923 film)

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Paddy the Next Best Thing
Directed by Graham Cutts
Produced by Herbert Wilcox
Written by Gertrude Page (novel)
Wilfred Noy
Herbert Wilcox
Eliot Stannard
Starring Mae Marsh
Darby Foster
Lilian Douglas
Cinematography René Guissart
Production
company
Distributed byGraham-Wilcox Productions (UK)
United Artists (US)
Release date
January 1923 (UK)
2 June 1923 (US)
Running time
7,200 feet [1]
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

Paddy the Next Best Thing is a 1923 British silent romance film directed by Graham Cutts and starring Mae Marsh, Darby Foster and Lilian Douglas. It was based on the 1912 novel of the same title by Gertrude Page and a 1920 stage adaptation, which was later adapted into a 1933 American film. It was made at the Gainsborough Studios in Islington. [2] American star Mae Marsh had been brought over from Hollywood to star in the company's previous film Flames of Passion and stayed on to make this film.

Contents

It is believed to be a lost film. [3]

Cast

See also

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References

  1. Low p.424
  2. Low p.133
  3. "Paddy the Next Best Thing". silentera.com. Retrieved 6 March 2013.

Bibliography