Money Means Nothing (1932 film)

Last updated

Men of Steel
Directed by Herbert Wilcox
Written by Douglas Furber
Miles Malleson
Harcourt Templeman
Produced byHerbert Wilcox
Starring John Loder
Kay Hammond
Gibb McLaughlin
Cinematography Charles Van Enger
Music by Lew Stone
Production
company
Distributed by Paramount British Pictures
Release date
September 1932
Running time
70 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

Money Means Nothing (also released as Butler's Millions) is a 1932 British comedy film directed by Herbert Wilcox and starring John Loder, Irene Richards and Miles Malleson. It was shot at Elstree Studios as a quota quickie for release by Paramount British. [1]

Contents

Synopsis

The screenplay concerns a butler who comes into some money through an inheritance, and turns the tables on his young master. [2]

Cast

Related Research Articles

A Tight Corner is a 1932 British comedy film directed by Leslie S. Hiscott and starring Frank Pettingell, Gina Malo, Betty Astell and Charles Stratton. It was made at Twickenham Studios as a quota quickie for release by MGM.

A Safe Proposition is a 1932 British comedy film directed by Leslie S. Hiscott and starring A. W. Baskcomb, Barbara Gott, Harold French and Austin Trevor. It was made at Twickenham Studios as a quota quickie for release by Fox Film.

Blind Justice is a 1934 British thriller film directed by Bernard Vorhaus and starring Eva Moore, Frank Vosper, Geraldine Fitzgerald, Roger Livesey, and John Mills. The screenplay concerns a woman who is blackmailed by a criminal, who has discovered that her brother was shot as a coward during World War I.

To Oblige a Lady is a 1931 British comedy film directed by H. Manning Haynes and starring Maisie Gay, Warwick Ward, Lilian Oldland, Haddon Mason and James Carew. The film is based on a play by Edgar Wallace. It was produced at Beaconsfield Studios as a quota quickie for release as a second feature.

Julius Hagen (1884–1940) was a German-born British film producer who produced more than a hundred films in Britain.

Men of Steel is a 1932 British drama film directed by George King and starring John Stuart, Benita Hume and Heather Angel. The screenplay was adapted by Edward Knoblock and Billie Bristow from a novel by Douglas Newton. It was shot at Walton Studios as a quota quickie for distribution by United Artists.

<i>The Ghost Camera</i> 1933 film

The Ghost Camera is a 1933 British mystery film directed by Bernard Vorhaus, starring Henry Kendall, Ida Lupino and John Mills, and based on "A Mystery Narrative", a short story by Joseph Jefferson Farjeon.

Rolling in Money is a 1934 British comedy film directed by Albert Parker and starring Isabel Jeans, Leslie Sarony and John Loder. It was made at Ealing Studios by the British subsidiary of Fox Film. It was not a quota quickie like much of the subsidiary's output at the time. It was an adaptation of the play Mr. Hopkinson by R. C. Carton.

Moira Lynd (1903-1984) was a British stage, television and film actress. During the 1930s she became a leading lady in British quota quickies. She made her last film in 1940, but made several television appearances in the post-war era.

<i>Death Drives Through</i> 1935 film

Death Drives Through is a 1935 British sports drama film directed by Edward L. Cahn and starring Chili Bouchier, Robert Douglas and Miles Mander. It was made as a quota quickie by the independent producer Clifford Taylor at Ealing Studios. The racing scenes were shot at Brooklands.

Youthful Folly is a 1934 British drama film directed by Miles Mander and starring Irene Vanbrugh, Jane Carr and Mary Lawson. It was a quota quickie made at Shepperton Studios for release by Columbia Pictures. It portrays the love lives of the son of daughter of an aristocratic lady.

Twelve Good Men is a 1936 British crime film directed by Ralph Ince and starring Henry Kendall, Nancy O'Neil and Joyce Kennedy. It was made at Teddington Studios by Warner Brothers as a quota quickie. It is based on the 1928 detective novel The Murders in Praed Street by John Rhode, with the principal series character of the book Doctor Priestley eliminated for the film.

Lest We Forget is a 1934 British drama film directed by John Baxter and starring Stewart Rome, George Carney and Esmond Knight. It was made as a quota quickie at Shepperton Studios.

Bedtime Story is a 1938 British comedy drama film directed by Donovan Pedelty and starring Jack Livesey, Lesley Wareing and Eliot Makeham. It was made as a quota quickie at Cricklewood Studios.

The Way of Youth is a 1934 British crime film directed by Norman Walker and starring Irene Vanbrugh, Aileen Marson and Sebastian Shaw. It was made at British and Dominions Elstree Studios as a quota quickie.

Head of the Family is a 1933 British drama film directed by John Daumery and starring Irene Vanbrugh, Arthur Maude and John Stuart. It was made at Teddington Studios as a quota quickie.

The Flaw is a 1933 British thriller film directed by Norman Walker and starring Henry Kendall, Eric Maturin and Phyllis Clare. It was made as a quota quickie at Wembley Studios, and was remade in 1955 with the same title.

A Lucky Sweep is a 1932 British comedy film directed by A. V. Bramble and starring John Longden, Diana Beaumont and A. G. Poulton. It was made at Elstree Studios as a quota quickie.

Above Rubies is a 1932 British comedy film directed by Frank Richardson and starring Zoe Palmer, Robin Irvine and Tom Helmore. It is set in Monte Carlo.

High Society is a 1932 British comedy film directed by John Rawlins and starring Florence Desmond, William Austin and Emily Fitzroy.

References

  1. Chibnall p.268
  2. "BFI | Film & TV Database | MONEY MEANS NOTHING (1932)". Archived from the original on 16 October 2012. Retrieved 16 August 2009.

Bibliography