Lord of the Manor (film)

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Lord of the Manor
Directed by Henry Edwards
Produced by Herbert Wilcox
Written byJohn Hastings Turner (play)
Dorothy Rowan
Starring Betty Stockfeld
Frederick Kerr
Henry Wilcoxon
Cinematography Henry Harris
Edited by Clifford Gulliver
Production
company
Distributed by Paramount British Pictures
Release date
May 1933
Running time
71 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
Language English

Lord of the Manor is a 1933 British comedy film directed by Henry Edwards and starring Betty Stockfeld, Frederick Kerr and Henry Wilcoxon. [1] It was based on a play by John Hastings Turner. It was made at Elstree Studios as a quota film for release by Paramount Pictures. [2]

Contents

The film's sets were designed by Wilfred Arnold.

Plot summary

During a party at a country house, a number of the guests switch their romantic partners.

Cast

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References

  1. BFI.org
  2. Chibnall p.273

Bibliography