The Astrophysical Journal

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History

The journal was founded in 1895 by George Ellery Hale and James E. Keeler as The Astrophysical Journal: An International Review of Spectroscopy and Astronomical Physics. [7] In addition to the two founding editors, there was an international board of associate editors: M. A. Cornu, Paris; N. C. Dunér, Upsala; William Huggins, London; P. Tacchini, Rome; H. C. Vogel, Potsdam, C. S. Hastings, Yale; A. A. Michelson, Chicago; E. C. Pickering, Harvard; H. A. Rowland, Johns Hopkins; and C. A. Young, Princeton. [8] It was intended that the journal would fill the gap between journals in astronomy and physics, providing a venue for publication of articles on astronomical applications of the spectroscope; on laboratory research closely allied to astronomical physics, including wavelength determinations of metallic and gaseous spectra and experiments on radiation and absorption; on theories of the Sun, Moon, planets, comets, meteors, and nebulae; and on instrumentation for telescopes and laboratories. [8] The further development of ApJ up to 1995 was outlined by Helmut Abt in an article entitled "Some Statistical Highlights of the Astrophysical Journal" in 1995. [9]

Editors

The following persons have been editors-in-chief of the journal:

See also

Related Research Articles

Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar Indian-American physicist

Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar was an Indian-American astrophysicist who spent his professional life in the United States. He was awarded the 1983 Nobel Prize for Physics with William A. Fowler for "...theoretical studies of the physical processes of importance to the structure and evolution of the stars". His mathematical treatment of stellar evolution yielded many of the current theoretical models of the later evolutionary stages of massive stars and black holes. The Chandrasekhar limit is named after him.

Astrophysics is a science that employs the methods and principles of physics and chemistry in the study of astronomical objects and phenomena. As one of the founders of the discipline said, Astrophysics "seeks to ascertain the nature of the heavenly bodies, rather than their positions or motions in space–what they are, rather than where they are." Among the subjects studied are the Sun, other stars, galaxies, extrasolar planets, the interstellar medium and the cosmic microwave background. Emissions from these objects are examined across all parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, and the properties examined include luminosity, density, temperature, and chemical composition. Because astrophysics is a very broad subject, astrophysicists apply concepts and methods from many disciplines of physics and chemistry, including classical mechanics, electromagnetism, statistical mechanics, thermodynamics, quantum mechanics, relativity, nuclear and particle physics, and atomic and molecular physics.

George Ellery Hale American solar astronomer

George Ellery Hale was an American solar astronomer, best known for his discovery of magnetic fields in sunspots, and as the leader or key figure in the planning or construction of several world-leading telescopes; namely, the 40-inch refracting telescope at Yerkes Observatory, 60-inch Hale reflecting telescope at Mount Wilson Observatory, 100-inch Hooker reflecting telescope at Mount Wilson, and the 200-inch Hale reflecting telescope at Palomar Observatory. He also played a key role in the foundation of the International Union for Cooperation in Solar Research and the National Research Council, and in developing the California Institute of Technology into a leading research university.

Epsilon Cancri Star in the constellation Cancer

Epsilon Cancri is a white-hued binary star system in the zodiac constellation of Cancer. It is the brightest member of the Beehive Cluster with an apparent visual magnitude of +6.29, which is near the lower limit of visibility with the naked eye. The annual parallax shift of 5.3 mas as seen from Earth yields a distance estimate of approximately 616 light-years from the Sun.

Celaeno (star) Star in the Taurus constellation

Celaeno, designated 16 Tauri, is a star in the constellation of Taurus and a member of the Pleiades open star cluster (M45) of stars.

Gamma Trianguli Australis Star in the constellation Triangulum Australe

Gamma Trianguli Australis, Latinized from γ Trianguli Australis, is a single, white-hued star in the southern constellation of Triangulum Australe. Along with Alpha and Beta Trianguli Australis it forms a prominent triangular asterism that gives the constellation its name. It is the third-brightest member of this constellation with an apparent visual magnitude of +2.87. Based upon parallax measurements, Gamma Trianguli Australis is located at a distance of about 184 light-years from Earth.

Mu Aquarii, Latinized from μ Aquarii, is the Bayer designation for a binary star system in the equatorial constellation of Aquarius. It is visible to the naked eye with a combined apparent visual magnitude of 4.7. Based upon parallax measurements, the distance to this system is about 157 light-years. It is drifting closer to the Sun with a radial velocity of −9.1 km/s.

108 Aquarii Star in the constellation Aquarius

108 Aquarii is a star in the equatorial constellation of Aquarius. 108 Aquarii is the Flamsteed designation, although it also bears the Bayer designation i3 Aquarii and the variable star designation ET Aquarii. It has an apparent visual magnitude of 5.194 and can be seen with the naked eye under suitably dark skies. Based upon an annual parallax shift of 10.23, the distance to this star is 319 light-years.

53 Arietis is a variable star in the northern constellation of Aries. 53 Arietis is the Flamsteed designation; it also bears the variable star designation UW Arietis. It is a B-type main sequence star with a stellar classification of B1.5 V and mean apparent magnitude of 6.10, which is near the lower limit for naked eye visibility. Based upon an annual parallax shift of 3.92 mas, the estimated distance to this star is roughly 800 light-years.

36 Aurigae Star in the constellation Auriga

36 Aurigae is a single variable star located about 910 light years away from the Sun in the constellation Auriga. It has the variable star designation V444 Aurigae, while 36 Aurigae is the Flamsteed designation. This object is visible to the naked eye as a dim, white-hued star with a baseline apparent visual magnitude of 5.71. It is moving further from the Earth with a heliocentric radial velocity of +16 km/s.

15 Cancri is an α2 CVn-type variable star in the zodiac constellation of Cancer, located around 980 light years away. It has the variable star designation BM Cancri ; 15 Cancri is the Flamsteed designation. This system is visible to the naked eye as a faint, white-hued star with an apparent visual magnitude of about 5.6. It is moving away from the Earth with a heliocentric radial velocity of 25 km/s.

16 Lyrae is a suspected astrometric binary star system in the constellation Lyra, located 126 light years away from the Sun based on parallax. It is visible to the naked eye as a dim, white-hued star with a combined apparent visual magnitude of 5.00. The system is moving further away from the Earth with a heliocentric radial velocity of +5 km/s. It is a suspected member of the Ursa Major Moving Group stream.

V1291 Aquilae is a single star in the equatorial constellation of Aquila. It has a yellow-white hue and is dimly visible to the naked eye with an apparent visual magnitude that fluctuates around 5.65. Based on parallax measurements, it is located at a distance of approximately 278 light years from the Sun. The star it is drifting closer with a radial velocity of −22 km/s.

HD 191984 is a double star in the equatorial constellation of Aquila. As of 2011, the components have an angular separation of 2.52″ along a position angle of 205.7°.

HD 23089 is a spectroscopic binary star in the northern constellation of Camelopardalis. Based on stellar parallax measurements made by Hipparcos, the system is about 800 ly away from the Sun.

HR 3082 is a double star in the northern circumpolar constellation of Camelopardalis. It is faintly visible to the naked eye with an apparent visual magnitude of 5.39. The system is moving closer to the Sun with a heliocentric radial velocity of +2.7 km/s. It is currently at a distance of around 323 light years, based upon an annual parallax shift of 10.10±0.24 mas.

21 Vulpeculae is a single, white-hued star in the northern constellation of Vulpecula. Its distance can be estimated from the annual parallax shift of 10.4302±0.0696 mas, yielding a separation of 313 light years. The star is faintly visible to the naked eye at night, having an apparent visual magnitude of 5.19. It is moving further away with a heliocentric radial velocity of about +7 km/s, having come within 243 ly (74.53 pc) around 4.2 million years ago.

45 Herculis Star in the constellation Hercules

45 Herculis is a solitary variable star in the northern constellation Hercules. It has the Bayer designation l Herculis and the variable star designation V776 Herculis. The Flamsteed designation for this star comes from the publication Historia Coelestis Britannica by John Flamsteed. It is the 45th star in Flamsteed list of stars in the constellation Hercules, and is visible to the naked eye with a baseline apparent visual magnitude of 5.22. Parallax measurements show this star to be about 400 light-years away from the Solar System. It is moving closer to the Earth with a heliocentric radial velocity of −16 km/s.

22 Cygni is a binary star system in the northern constellation of Cygnus. It is visible to the naked eye as a faint, blue-white hued star with an apparent visual magnitude of 4.95. The annual shift of 3.0 mas yields a distance estimate of around 1,070 light years. It is moving closer to the Earth with a heliocentric radial velocity of −15 km/s.

38 Geminorum is a binary star system in the northern zodiac constellation of Gemini. It has the Bayer designation e Geminorum, while 38 Geminorum is the Flamsteed designation. This system is visible to the naked eye as a faint, white-hued point of light with an apparent visual magnitude of 4.71. The primary component is a magnitude 4.75 star, while the secondary is magnitude 7.80. The system is located about 98 light years away from the Sun based on parallax, and is drifting further away with a radial velocity of +16 km/s. It is a potential member of the Tucana–Horologium stellar kinematic group.

References

  1. Referred to as ApJ on own Web site
  2. "American Astronomical Society Journals Going Electronic Only". IOP Publishing. 2014-06-02. Retrieved 2017-01-12.
  3. "American Astronomical Society Selects Institute of Physics Publishing As New Publishing Partner". PR Newswire Europe Ltd. 2007-04-25. Retrieved 2007-07-21.
  4. Howard, Jennifer (2007-05-18). "U. of Chicago Press Loses 3 Journals After Publishing Agreement Is Changed". Chronicle of Higher Education. Archived from the original on 2021-04-26. Retrieved 2009-02-12.
  5. Abt, Helmut (2009). "Reviewing and Revision Times for The Astrophysical Journal". Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific. 121 (885): 1291–1293. Bibcode:2009PASP..121.1291A. doi: 10.1086/648536 .
  6. Pattasch, S. R.; Praderie, F. (1988). "Comparison of astronomical journals" (PDF). The ESO Messenger. 53: 16. Bibcode:1988Msngr..53...16P.
  7. The Astrophysical Journal. 1(1).
  8. 1 2 Hale, George Ellery (1895), "The Astrophysical Journal", The Astrophysical Journal, 1 (1): 80–84, Bibcode:1895ApJ.....1...80H, doi:10.1086/140011
  9. Abt, H A (1995). "Some Statistical Highlights of the Astrophysical Journal". The Astrophysical Journal. 455: 407. Bibcode:1995ApJ...455..407A. doi:10.1086/176587.
  10. Helmut A. Abt (1 December 1995). "Obituary – Chandrasekhar, Subrahmanyan". Astrophysical Journal. 454: 551. Bibcode:1995ApJ...454..551A. doi:10.1086/176507.