The Sitter Downers

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The Sitter Downers
SitterDownersTITLE.jpg
Directed by Del Lord
Produced by Jules White
Written by Ewart Adamson
Starring Moe Howard
Larry Fine
Curly Howard
Marcia Healy
June Gittelson
Betty Mack
James C. Morton
Cinematography George Meehan
Edited by Charles Nelson
Distributed by Columbia Pictures
Release date
  • November 26, 1937 (1937-11-26)(U.S.)
Running time
15:34
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

The Sitter Downers is a 1937 short subject directed by Del Lord starring American slapstick comedy team The Three Stooges (Moe Howard, Larry Fine and Curly Howard). It is the 27th entry in the series released by Columbia Pictures starring the comedians, who released 190 shorts for the studio between 1934 and 1959.

Contents

Plot

The Stooges are suitors who go on a sitdown strike at their fiancees' home when their prospective father-in-law (James C. Morton) refuses to consent the marriages. The strike wins them fame and they receive numerous gifts from fans, including a lot and materials for a house via the United States Housing Authority. The father-in-law reaches out to the government to have the Stooges removed from his house, but the government cannot intervene. The father-in-law eventually gets fed up and allows the Stooges to marry his daughters to end their strike.

The newly married couples soon arrive at their donated house lot, but realize that their new home is prefab and they must build it themselves. Their wives decree that they will have no honeymoon until the Stooges finish the job. Now mad at their nagging wives, they get to work anyway. Eventually they do finish building the house, though in a poorly constructed fashion, including a flight of stairs that goes nowhere and a bathtub mounted to a wall. The wives are impressed, but as one of them pushes a loose board out of her way, the entire roof ends up crashing on top of all of them.

Production notes

The Stooges' wives are named Florabell (June Gittelson), Corabell (Betty Mack), and Dorabell (Marcia Healy, sister of the Stooges' former boss, Ted Healy). This was the last Stooge film released during Ted Healy's lifetime: he died on December 21, 1937. [1] Filming commenced between May 27 and June 2, 1937. [2]

A colorized version of this film was released as part of the 2004 DVD collection entitled "Goofs on the Loose". [3]

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References

  1. Solomon, Jon (2002). The Complete Three Stooges: The Official Filmography and Three Stooges Companion. Comedy III Productions, Inc. p. 142. ISBN   0-9711868-0-4.
  2. Pauley, Jim (2012). The Three Stooges Hollywood Filming Locations. Solana Beach, California: Santa Monica Press, LLC. p. 230. ISBN   9781595800701.
  3. Goofs on the Loose