Some More of Samoa

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Some More of Samoa
Somemore ofsoamoaTITLE.jpg
Directed by Del Lord
Produced by Hugh McCollum
Del Lord
Written by Elwood Ullman
Harry Edwards
Starring Moe Howard
Larry Fine
Curly Howard
Mary Ainslee
Symona Boniface
Louise Carver
Duke York
Dudley Dickerson
John Tyrrell
Cinematography L. William O'Connell
Edited by Burton Kramer
Distributed by Columbia Pictures
Release date
  • December 4, 1941 (1941-12-04)(U.S.)
Running time
16:40
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

Some More of Samoa is a 1941 short subject directed by Del Lord starring American slapstick comedy team The Three Stooges (Moe Howard, Larry Fine and Curly Howard). It is the 59th entry in the series released by Columbia Pictures starring the comedians, who released 190 shorts for the studio between 1934 and 1959.

Contents

Plot

The Stooges are tree surgeons who are enlisted by a rich old man to find a mate for his rare puckerless persimmon tree. The boys sail to the fictional tropical island of Rhum-Boogie to find the tree. When they arrive they are captured by the natives and will be eaten unless Curly marries the Chief's ugly sister. The Stooges manage to escape with the tree and, after a confrontation with an alligator, sail off with their prize.

Production notes

Some More of Samoa was filmed on May 12–15, 1941. [1] The film's title is a self-contained pun, as "Samoa" is pronounced similarly to slurring "some more of" as "some mo' o'". The film is set on the fictional island of Rhum Boogie, not Samoa. [2]

There are several continuity errors in Some More of Samoa. When Curly runs into the king’s hut he is still covered with the white powder draped on him from when a tribesman is preparing the Stooges for dinner, but when he goes into the hut and tangles with the Kabuki mask, the powder is gone. After he grabs the tree and runs off, the powder is back on. In addition, when Curly puts his head in the bag to answer the telephone, he starts whining before Moe actually closes the bag on his neck. [2]

When Moe and Larry run into the king and he introduces himself as "King Fish" they reply with an Amos 'n Andy joke routine. Kingfish was a recurring character in the Amos 'n Andy radio show.

Some More of Samoa features a recurring gag often shown when the Stooges portray doctors or are mixing drinks, as in the films Men In Black and All Gummed Up . They stand in an assembly line formation and the first member (usually Moe) calls for a series of complex, often gibberish-sounding surgical tools or drink ingredients, with the other two repeating the orders and passing them to him. At a certain point, Moe will call for cotton, and be ignored at first, then angrily call for it again, prompting one of the other Stooges to retaliate and throw a large wad of wet cotton at Moe's face.

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References

  1. Pauley, Jim (2012). The Three Stooges Hollywood Filming Locations. Solana Beach, California: Santa Monica Press, LLC. p. 248. ISBN   9781595800701.
  2. 1 2 Solomon, Jon (2002). The Complete Three Stooges: The Official Filmography and Three Stooges Companion. Glendale, California: Comedy III Productions, Inc. pp. 200–201. ISBN   0-9711868-0-4.