Thomas Godwin (politician)

Last updated
Thomas Godwin
16th Speaker of the Virginia House of Burgesses
In office
June 1676 June 1676
Preceded by Augustine Warner Jr.
Succeeded by Augustine Warner Jr.
Personal details
Died 1677/8
Virginia
Children Thomas, Edmund, Elizabeth
Residence Nansemond County, Virginia
Military service
Service/branch Virginia militia
Rank Colonel

Thomas Godwin (died 1677/8) was a Virginia politician and landowner. He served in the House of Burgesses 165455 and 1659, and was its Speaker in the June 1676 session that preceded Bacon's Rebellion. [1]

Colony of Virginia English/British possession in North America (1607-1776)

The Colony of Virginia, chartered in 1606 and settled in 1607, was the first enduring English colony in North America, following failed proprietary attempts at settlement on Newfoundland by Sir Humphrey Gilbert in 1583, and the subsequent further south Roanoke Island by Sir Walter Raleigh in the late 1580s.

House of Burgesses

The Virginia House of Burgesses was formed in 1642/43 by the General Assembly. By its creation, the General Assembly then became bicameral.

Bacons Rebellion 1676 Virginia rebellion against the colonial government

Bacon's Rebellion was an armed rebellion in 1676 by Virginia settlers led by Nathaniel Bacon against the rule of Governor William Berkeley. The colony's dismissive policy as it related to the political challenges of its western frontier, along with other challenges including leaving Bacon out of his inner circle, refusing to allow Bacon to be a part of his fur trade with Native Americans, and attacks by the Doeg people, helped to motivate a popular uprising against Berkeley, who had failed to address the demands of the colonists regarding their safety.

Godwin's birth and early years are undocumented. He partnered with Richard Axom to patent land in York County, Virginia in 1650. By April 1654 he was a member of the Nansemond County Court, and he represented the county in the House of Burgesses that year and next. He was also elected to the session of 1659. [1] [2]

York County, Virginia county in Virginia, United States

York County is a county in the eastern part of the Commonwealth of Virginia, located in the Tidewater. As of the 2010 census, the population was 65,464. The county seat is the unincorporated town of Yorktown.

Nansemond County, Virginia extinct locality that was located in Virginia Colony and the Commonwealth of Virginia

Nansemond is an extinct locality that was located in Virginia Colony and the Commonwealth of Virginia in the United States, from 1646 until 1974. It was Nansemond County until 1972, and the independent city of Nansemond from 1972 to 1974. It is now part of the independent city of Suffolk.

Among his other land purchases, he patented a tract in Chuckatuck parish in 1668. This farm was expressly included in Nansemond County when the Assembly drew its boundary with Isle of Wight County in 1674. [1]

Chuckatuck is a neighborhood of the independent city of Suffolk, Virginia, United States. It is located at the junction of State Route 10/State Route 32 and State Route 125, just south of SR 10/32's crossing of Chuckatuck Creek. Its elevation is 36 feet above mean sea level. The neighborhood is relatively small and consists of such businesses as a garden store, general store, automobile repair shop, three churches, two gas stations, a restaurant, a hardware store, and others. It has a fire department, Suffolk station nine, which is operated as the Chuckatuck Volunteer Fire Department. The community is also located near Lone Star Lakes, a recreational park.

Isle of Wight County, Virginia county in Virginia

Isle of Wight County is a county located in the Hampton Roads region of the U.S. state of Virginia. It was named after the Isle of Wight, in the English Channel, from where many of its early colonists had come. As of the 2010 census, the population was 35,270. Its county seat is Isle of Wight.

In March 1676 he was identified as colonel of the Nansemond militia when he was authorized to raise a force to fight Indians. [2]

Godwin was not a member of the General Assembly of 166176. When it was dissolved and a new Assembly met in June 1676, he was elected Speaker of the House. [1] This Assembly, which met just before the outbreak of Bacon's Rebellion, had all its acts annulled by the Assembly that met the following year, although a number of them were reenacted by that same session. [3]

Virginia General Assembly legislative body of Virginia, United States

The Virginia General Assembly is the legislative body of the Commonwealth of Virginia, and the oldest continuous law-making body in the New World, established on July 30, 1619. The General Assembly is a bicameral body consisting of a lower house, the Virginia House of Delegates, with 100 members, and an upper house, the Senate of Virginia, with 40 members. Combined together, the General Assembly consists of 140 elected representatives from an equal number of constituent districts across the commonwealth. The House of Delegates is presided over by the Speaker of the House, while the Senate is presided over by the Lieutenant Governor of Virginia. The House and Senate each elect a clerk and sergeant-at-arms. The Senate of Virginia's clerk is known as the "Clerk of the Senate".

Godwin's will was dated March 24, 1677 (old style). He named three children as heirs. [2]

Old Style and New Style dates 16th-century changes in calendar conventions

Old Style (O.S.) and New Style (N.S.) are terms sometimes used with dates to indicate that the calendar convention used at the time described is different from that in use at the time the document was being written. There were two calendar changes in Great Britain and its colonies, which may sometimes complicate matters: the first was to change the start of the year from Lady Day to 1 January; the second was to discard the Julian calendar in favour of the Gregorian calendar. Closely related is the custom of dual dating, where writers gave two consecutive years to reflect differences in the starting date of the year, or to include both the Julian and Gregorian dates.

Notes

  1. 1 2 3 4 Kukla, pp. 68-69
  2. 1 2 3 Tyler, pp. 242-243
  3. Kukla, p. 67

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