Thomas Richards House

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Thomas Richards House
THOMAS RICHARDS HOUSE, CECIL COUNTY, MD.jpg
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Location Conowingo Road (US 1), Rising Sun, Maryland
Coordinates 39°41′34″N76°6′41″W / 39.69278°N 76.11139°W / 39.69278; -76.11139 Coordinates: 39°41′34″N76°6′41″W / 39.69278°N 76.11139°W / 39.69278; -76.11139
Area 4.2 acres (1.7 ha)
NRHP reference # 79001122 [1]
Added to NRHP December 19, 1979

The Thomas Richards House is a historic home located at Rising Sun, Cecil County, Maryland, United States. It is a stone and brick farmhouse; the 1 12-story kitchen section of fieldstone construction dating from the late 18th century, and the main block of brick construction, dating from the early 19th century. Also on the property is a large stone and wood three-level bank barn. [2]

Rising Sun, Maryland Town in Maryland, United States

Rising Sun is a town in Cecil County, Maryland, United States. The population was 2,781 at the 2010 census.

Cecil County, Maryland County in the United States

Cecil County is a county located in the U.S. state of Maryland. As of the 2010 census, the population was 101,108. The county seat is Elkton. The county was named for Cecil Calvert, 2nd Baron Baltimore (1605–1675), the first Proprietary Governor of the Province (colony) of Maryland. It is the only Maryland county that is part of the Philadelphia-Camden-Wilmington, PA-NJ-DE-MD Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Maryland State of the United States of America

Maryland is a state in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States, bordering Virginia, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia to its south and west; Pennsylvania to its north; and Delaware to its east. The state's largest city is Baltimore, and its capital is Annapolis. Among its occasional nicknames are Old Line State, the Free State, and the Chesapeake Bay State. It is named after the English queen Henrietta Maria, known in England as Queen Mary.

The Thomas Richards House was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

Bank barn, April 2010 Thomas Richards House Bank Barn Apr 10.JPG
Bank barn, April 2010

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. Ronald W. and Audrey S. Edwards (July 1977). "National Register of Historic Places Registration: Thomas Richards House" (PDF). Maryland Historical Trust. Retrieved 2016-01-01.