Thomas Salusbury (Liverpool MP)

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Thomas Salusbury (died 1756), of Shotwick Park, near Chester, born as Thomas Brereton, was a British Whig politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1724 and 1756. He was also Lord Mayor of Liverpool.

Shotwick Park

Shotwick Park is a former civil parish, now in the parishes of Saughall and Shotwick Park and Puddington, in the unitary authority of Cheshire West and Chester and the ceremonial county of Cheshire, England. Located near the village of Shotwick, it is four miles north west of Chester and close to the Welsh border. The civil parish was abolished in 2015 to form Saughall and Shotwick Park, part also went to Puddington.

The office of Lord Mayor of Liverpool has existed in one form or another since the foundation of Liverpool as a borough by the Royal Charter of King John in 1207, simply being referred to as the Mayor of Liverpool. The current Lord Mayor of Liverpool is the Right Worshipful Councillor Christine Banks who has held the post since May 2018. The most prominent Mayors were the Stanleys of Knowsley, of which Sir Thomas Stanley and the 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 16th and 18th Earls of Derby have held this office since ancient times. The Molyneuxs of Sefton have also held this office on numerous occasions over the centuries: Sir Richard Molyneux, his grandson Sir Richard Molyneux Baronet, the 1st Viscount Molyneux and the 7th Earl of Sefton.

Brereton was the son of Edward Brereton of Chester, a saddler and innkeeper, and his wife Mary Fletcher, daughter of John Fletcher, a barber of Chester. He married Mary Trelawny, the daughter of Henry Trelawny, MP, of Whitley, Devon, before 1714. [1]

Henry Trelawny English politician and Army officer

Brigadier-General Henry Trelawny was a British Army officer of Cornish descent, a Member of Parliament and Vice-Admiral of Cornwall.

Brereton's marriage gave him considerable electoral interest at Liverpool. He was returned unopposed as Member of Parliament for Liverpool at a by-election on 20 November 1724 on the death of Langham Booth, and was then elected in a contest at the general election in 1727. He was appointed Commissioner for victualling the navy in 1729 but lost his seat in Parliament at the consequent by-election on 28 May 1729.

Liverpool was a Borough constituency in the county of Lancashire of the House of Commons for the Parliament of England to 1706 then of the Parliament of Great Britain from 1707 to 1800 and of the Parliament of the United Kingdom from 1801 to 1885. It was represented by two Members of Parliament (MPs). In 1868, this was increased to three Members of Parliament.

1727 British general election

The 1727 British general election returned members to serve in the House of Commons of the 7th Parliament of Great Britain to be summoned, after the merger of the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland in 1707. The election was triggered by the death of King George I; at the time, it was the convention to hold new elections following the succession of a new monarch. The Tories, led in the House of Commons by William Wyndham, and under the direction of Bolingbroke, who had returned to the country in 1723 after being pardoned for his role in the Jacobite rising of 1715, lost further ground to the Whigs, rendering them ineffectual and largely irrelevant to practical politics. A group known as the Patriot Whigs, led by William Pulteney, who were disenchanted with Walpole's government and believed he was betraying Whig principles, had been formed prior to the election. Bolingbroke and Pulteney had not expected the next election to occur until 1729, and were consequently caught unprepared and failed to make any gains against the government party.

Victualling Commissioners

The Commissioners for the Victualling of the Navy, often called the Victualling Commissioners or Victualling Board, was the body responsible under the Navy Board for victualling ships of the British Royal Navy. It oversaw the vast operation of providing naval personnel with enough food, drink and supplies to keep them fighting fit, sometimes for months at a time, in whatever part of the globe they might be stationed. It existed from 1683 until 1832 when its function was first replaced by the Department of the Comptroller of Victualling and Transport Services until 1869 then that office was also abolished and replaced by the Victualling Department.

Brereton made a second marriage in about 1731 to Catherine Lloyd, daughter of Salusbury Lloyd of Leadbrook, Flintshire, the MP for Flint Boroughs. He was mayor of Liverpool for the year 1733 to 1734. On the death of his father-in-law in 1734 he succeeded to the latter's estates, including Shotwick Park. [1] He was elected MP for Liverpool again at the general election in 1734 and was returned unopposed in 1741. He resigned his office as Commissioner for victualling in 1747 in accordance with the Place Act of 1742, which made it incompatible with a seat in the House of Commons, and was returned unopposed for Liverpool again at the 1747 general election. He was also given a secret service pension of £500 p.a. He changed his surname from Brereton to Salusbury by a 1748 private Act of Parliament. [2] He was returned successfully for Liverpool in a contest at the 1754 general election. [3]

Salusbury Lloyd, of Leadbrook, Flintshire, was a British Whig politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1728 to 1734.

Flint Boroughs was a parliamentary constituency in north-east Wales which returned one Member of Parliament (MP) to the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom and its predecessors, from 1542 until it was abolished for the 1918 general election.

1734 British general election

The 1734 British general election returned members to serve in the House of Commons of the 8th Parliament of Great Britain to be summoned, after the merger of the Parliament of England and the Parliament of Scotland in 1707. Robert Walpole's increasingly unpopular Whig government lost ground to the Tories and the opposition Whigs, but still had a secure majority in the House of Commons. The Patriot Whigs were joined in opposition by a group of Whig members led by Lord Cobham known as the Cobhamites, or 'Cobham's Cubs'

Salusbury died on 9 March 1756.There were no children from his second marriage, but he had four sons and a daughter by his first wife. His son Owen Salusbury Brereton became an MP and antiquary.

Owen Salusbury Brereton,, born Owen Brereton, was an English antiquary.

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References

  1. 1 2 Eveline Cruickshanks, BRERETON (afterwards SALUSBURY), Thomas (d.1756), of Shotwick Park, nr. Chester. in The History of Parliament: the House of Commons 1715-1754.
  2. Deed Poll Office: Private Act of Parliament 1748 (22 Geo. 2). c. 47
  3. "SALUSBURY (formerly BRERETON), Thomas (d.1756), of Shotwick Park, nr. Chester". History of Parliament Online (1754-1790). Retrieved 12 January 2019.
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Langham Booth
Thomas Bootle
Member of Parliament for Liverpool
1724–1729
With: Thomas Bootle
Succeeded by
Sir Thomas Aston, Bt.
Thomas Bootle
Preceded by
Sir Thomas Aston, Bt.
Thomas Bootle
Member of Parliament for Liverpool
1734–1756
With: Richard Gildart (1734-1754)
John Hardman (1754-1755)
Sir Ellis Cunliffe (1755-1756)
Succeeded by
Charles Pole
Sir Ellis Cunliffe