Thomas W. Fleming House (Fairmont, West Virginia)

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Thomas W. Fleming House
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Location300 1st St., Fairmont, West Virginia
Coordinates 39°28′53.4″N80°8′41.28″W / 39.481500°N 80.1448000°W / 39.481500; -80.1448000 Coordinates: 39°28′53.4″N80°8′41.28″W / 39.481500°N 80.1448000°W / 39.481500; -80.1448000
Area0.4 acres (0.16 ha)
Built1901
Architectural styleColonial Revival, Beaux Arts
NRHP reference No. 79002587 [1]
Added to NRHPAugust 29, 1979

Thomas W. Fleming House, also known as the Clubhouse of the Women's Club of Fairmont, is a historic home located at Fairmont, Marion County, West Virginia. It was built in 1901, and is a 2+12-story, "U"-shaped, stucco masonry building in a Colonial Revival / Beaux-Arts style. It has a rectangular central block that is joined at the rear by two short wings. It features rounded, glass-enclosed entrance solarium. It became the clubhouse of the Fairmont Woman's Club in 1938. Its builder, Thomas W. Fleming (1846-1937), served two terms as mayor of Fairmont and was elected to the House of Delegates in 1905. [2]

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1979. [1]

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  2. Rodney S. Collins (April 1979). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory Nomination Form: Thomas W. Fleming House" (PDF). State of West Virginia, West Virginia Division of Culture and History, Historic Preservation. Retrieved 2011-08-05.