Thomas Watson-Wentworth

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Memorial to Thomas Watson-Wentworth in the north choir aisle of York Minster York Minster, Lord Rockingham monument (28907058007).jpg
Memorial to Thomas Watson-Wentworth in the north choir aisle of York Minster

Hon. Thomas Watson, later known as Thomas Watson-Wentworth (17 June 1665 – 6 October 1723), of Wentworth Woodhouse in Yorkshire, was an English landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons between 1701 and 1723.

Wentworth Woodhouse

Wentworth Woodhouse is a Grade I listed country house in the village of Wentworth, in the Metropolitan Borough of Rotherham in South Yorkshire, England. It is currently owned by the Wentworth Woodhouse Preservation Trust. Considered to be the largest private residence in the United Kingdom, it has an east front of 606 feet (185 m); the longest country house façade in Europe. The house has more than 300 rooms, although the precise number is unclear, with 250,000 square feet (23,000 m2) of floorspace. It covers an area of more than 2.5 acres (1.0 ha), and is surrounded by a 180-acre (73 ha) park, and an estate of 15,000 acres (6,100 ha).

The House of Commons is the elected lower house of the bicameral parliaments of the United Kingdom and Canada and historically was the name of the lower houses of the Kingdom of England, Kingdom of Great Britain, Kingdom of Ireland, Northern Ireland, and Southern Ireland. Roughly equivalent bodies in other countries which were once part of the British Empire include the United States House of Representatives, the Australian House of Representatives, the New Zealand House of Representatives, and India's Lok Sabha.

Contents

Origins

He was the third son of Edward Watson, 2nd Baron Rockingham (1630-1689) by his wife Anne Wentworth, only daughter of Thomas Wentworth, 1st Earl of Strafford (1593-1641) and heiress of her childless brother William Wentworth, 2nd Earl of Strafford (1626-1695) of Wentworth Woodhouse. His eldest brother was Lewis Watson, 1st Earl of Rockingham, 3rd Baron Rockingham (1655-1724), who in 1714 was created Earl of Rockingham.

Thomas Wentworth, 1st Earl of Strafford English earl and politician

Thomas Wentworth, 1st Earl of Strafford was an English statesman and a major figure in the period leading up to the English Civil War. He served in Parliament and was a supporter of King Charles I. From 1632 to 1640 he was Lord Deputy of Ireland, where he established a strong authoritarian rule. Recalled to England, he became a leading advisor to the King, attempting to strengthen the royal position against Parliament. When Parliament condemned Wentworth to death, Charles reluctantly signed the death warrant and Wentworth was executed.

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Early life

He matriculated at Christ Church, Oxford in 1683. [1]

Christ Church, Oxford Constituent college of the University of Oxford in England

Christ Church is a constituent college of the University of Oxford in England. Christ Church is a joint foundation of the college and the cathedral of the Oxford diocese, which serves as the college chapel and whose dean is ex officio the college head.

Marriage & progeny

By licence dated 18 July 1689 he married Alice Proby, a daughter and heiress [2] of Sir Thomas Proby, 1st Baronet, [3] by whom he had progeny including:

Thomas Watson-Wentworth, 1st Marquess of Rockingham British politician

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Order of the Bath Series of awards of an order of chivalry of the United Kingdom

The Most Honourable Order of the Bath is a British order of chivalry founded by George I on 18 May 1725. The name derives from the elaborate medieval ceremony for appointing a knight, which involved bathing as one of its elements. The knights so created were known as "Knights of the Bath". George I "erected the Knights of the Bath into a regular Military Order". He did not revive the Order of the Bath, since it had never previously existed as an Order, in the sense of a body of knights who were governed by a set of statutes and whose numbers were replenished when vacancies occurred.

The Privy Council of Ireland was an institution of the Kingdom of Ireland until 31 December 1800 and of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 1801 to 1922. It performed a similar role in the Dublin Castle administration in Ireland to that of the Privy Council of the United Kingdom in the government of the United Kingdom.

Wentworth inheritance

Inscription on monument of William Wentworth, 2nd Earl of Strafford in York Minster recording his heir as Thomas Watson, with an obligation to adopt the surname "Wentworth" York Minster Interior Tomb William Wentworth, Earl of Strafford 1695.jpg
Inscription on monument of William Wentworth, 2nd Earl of Strafford in York Minster recording his heir as Thomas Watson, with an obligation to adopt the surname "Wentworth"

In 1695 Watson inherited the fortune of his maternal uncle William Wentworth, 2nd Earl of Strafford, including the vast estate of Wentworth Woodhouse in Yorkshire, with others in Northamptonshire and Ireland. This was in preference to the Earl's first cousin once-removed Thomas Wentworth (later created Earl of Strafford), who shared with him common ancestry in the male line, and it led to a fierce rivalry between the two men and their families. In accordance with the terms of the bequest, [4] Watson adopted the additional surname of Wentworth, becoming Thomas Watson-Wentworth. [3]

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Lieutenant-General Thomas Wentworth, 1st Earl of Strafford, KG, known as Thomas Wentworth, 3rd Baron Raby from 1695 to 1711, was an English peer, diplomat and statesman who served as First Lord of the Admiralty.

Earl of Strafford title

Earl of Strafford is a title that has been created three times in English and British history.

Career

Watson-Wentworth was returned unopposed as Whig Member of Parliament for Bossiney at a by-election on 21 March 1701. He was only returned as a stop-gap and at the general election later that year he sought a seat elsewhere but in the end decided not to stand. At the 1702 general election, he stood at Higham Ferrers but was defeated. However his opponent died within a year and Watson-Wentworth was returned unopposed for Higham Ferrers at a by-election on 22 November 1703. He acquired the electoral interest at Higham Ferrers and was returned unopposed at the general elections of 1705, 1708 and 1710. He made little impression in his first parliaments, but being a church supporter moved progressively towards the Tories culminating in opposing the impeachment of Dr Sacheverell and being considered a worthy patriot. At the 1713 general election he was returned at Malton as well as Higham Ferrers and decided to sit for Malton. Now being considered whimsical or a Whig that voted with the Tories he supported the Whigs against the expulsion of Richard Steele and in other divisions. [3] After the 1715 general election, when he and his son were elected in a contest at Malton, he was classified as a Whig, but voted against the government on almost every occasion. At the 1722 general election he was returned unopposed again for Higham Ferrers. [5]

Death and burial

Watson-Wentworth died at Harrowden on 6 October 1723 and was buried in York Minster where his elaborate monument with standing marble effigy survives. [3]

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References

  1. Foster, Joseph. "'Wasborow-Wesley', in Alumni Oxonienses 1500-1714, ed. Joseph Foster (Oxford, 1891), pp. 1577-1600". British History Online. Retrieved 17 November 2018.
  2. He displays her arms as an inescutcheon of pretence
  3. 1 2 3 4 "WENTWORTH, Hon. Thomas Watson (1665-1723), of Wentworth Woodhouse, Yorks. and Great Harrowden, Northants". History of Parliament Online (1690-1715). Retrieved 9 August 2018.
  4. As is publicy recorded on the monument to William Wentworth, 2nd Earl of Strafford in York Minster
  5. "WATSON WENTWORTH, Hon. Thomas (1665-1723), of Wentworth Woodhouse, Yorks". History of Parliament Online (1715-1754). Retrieved 10 January 2019.
Parliament of England
Preceded by
Francis Robartes
John Tregagle
Member of Parliament for Bossiney
1701
With: John Tregagle
Succeeded by
Sir John Molesworth
John Manley
Preceded by
Thomas Pemberton
Member of Parliament for Higham Ferrers
1703–1708
Succeeded by
Parliament of Great Britain
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Parliament of England
Member of Parliament for Higham Ferrers
17081713
Succeeded by
Charles Leigh
Preceded by
William Palmes
William Strickland
Member of Parliament for Malton
17131722
With: William Strickland
Thomas Watson-Wentworth (the younger) 1715
Succeeded by
Sir William Strickland
Thomas Watson-Wentworth (the younger)
Preceded by
Charles Leigh
Member of Parliament for Higham Ferrers
1722–1723
Succeeded by
John Finch