Thomas and Mary Hogan House

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Thomas and Mary Hogan House
THOMAS AND MARY HOGAN HOUSE; ORANGE COUNTY.jpg
Thomas and Mary Hogan House, March 2007
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Location9118 Hillsborough Rd., near Carrboro, North Carolina
Coordinates 35°56′18″N79°06′15″W / 35.93825°N 79.10424°W / 35.93825; -79.10424 Coordinates: 35°56′18″N79°06′15″W / 35.93825°N 79.10424°W / 35.93825; -79.10424
Area22 acres (8.9 ha)
Builtc. 1860 (1860), c. 1890
Built byHutchins, Moses
Architectural styleGreek Revival, Queen Anne
NRHP reference # 01000016 [1]
Added to NRHPJanuary 26, 2001

Thomas and Mary Hogan House is a historic home located near Carrboro, Orange County, North Carolina. It was built about 1860, as a 1 1/2-story, Greek Revival style frame dwelling. It was enlarged to two-stories and updated with Queen Anne style design elements about 1890. The farmhouse is sheathed in plain weatherboard, has a gable-and-wing form, one gable end brick chimney, one interior brick chimney, and a one-story wraparound porch. [2]

Carrboro, North Carolina Town in North Carolina, United States

Carrboro is a town in Orange County in the U.S. state of North Carolina. The population was 19,582 at the 2010 census. The town, which is part of the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill combined statistical area, was named after North Carolina industrialist Julian Shakespeare Carr.

Orange County, North Carolina U.S. county in North Carolina, United States

Orange County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of the 2010 census, the population was 133,801. Its county seat is Hillsborough.

Greek Revival architecture architectural movement of the late 18th and early 19th centuries

The Greek Revival was an architectural movement of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, predominantly in Northern Europe and the United States. It revived the style of ancient Greek architecture, in particular the Greek temple, with varying degrees of thoroughness and consistency. A product of Hellenism, it may be looked upon as the last phase in the development of Neoclassical architecture, which had for long mainly drawn from Roman architecture. The term was first used by Charles Robert Cockerell in a lecture he gave as Professor of Architecture to the Royal Academy of Arts, London in 1842.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2001. [1]

National Register of Historic Places Federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred in preserving the property.

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. 2010-07-09.
  2. M. Ruth Little (August 2000). "Thomas and Mary Hogan House" (pdf). National Register of Historic Places - Nomination and Inventory. North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office. Retrieved 2015-02-01.