Thompson House (Wake Forest, North Carolina)

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Thompson House
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Location2528 Old NC Highway 98, near Wake Forest, North Carolina
Coordinates 35°58′10″N78°34′8″W / 35.96944°N 78.56889°W / 35.96944; -78.56889 Coordinates: 35°58′10″N78°34′8″W / 35.96944°N 78.56889°W / 35.96944; -78.56889
Area2.1 acres (0.85 ha)
Builtc. 1853 (1853)
Architectural styleGreek Revival
NRHP reference # 05001030 [1]
Added to NRHPSeptember 15, 2005

Thompson House, also known as the William Thompson House, is a historic plantation house located near Wake Forest, Wake County, North Carolina. It was built about 1853, and is a two-story, three-bay Greek Revival-style frame dwelling. It is sheathed in weatherboard, sits on a fieldstone foundation, and has four brick chimneys, two on each side. Also on the property is a contributing 1 1/2-story barn (c. 1853). The house and barn were moved to its present location in 2004. [2]

Wake Forest, North Carolina Town in North Carolina, United States

Wake Forest is a town in Franklin and Wake counties in the U.S. state of North Carolina; located almost entirely in Wake County, it lies just north of the state capital, Raleigh. The population was 30,117 at the 2010 census, up from 12,588 at the 2000 census. The U.S. Census Bureau estimates the city's population to be 34,752 as of July 1, 2013. In 2007, the town was listed by Forbes magazine as the 20th fastest growing suburb in America, with a 73.2 percent increase in population between 2000 and 2006. Wake Forest was the original home of Wake Forest University for 122 years before it moved to Winston-Salem in 1956.

Wake County, North Carolina U.S. county in North Carolina, United States

Wake County is a county in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of July 1, 2015, the population was 1,024,198, making it North Carolina's second-most populous county. From July 2005 to July 2006, Wake County was the 9th fastest-growing county in the United States, with the town of Cary and the city of Raleigh being the 8th and 15th fastest-growing cities, respectively.

Greek Revival architecture architectural movement of the late 18th and early 19th centuries

The Greek Revival was an architectural movement of the late 18th and early 19th centuries, predominantly in Northern Europe and the United States. It revived the style of ancient Greek architecture, in particular the Greek temple, with varying degrees of thoroughness and consistency. A product of Hellenism, it may be looked upon as the last phase in the development of Neoclassical architecture, which had for long mainly drawn from Roman architecture. The term was first used by Charles Robert Cockerell in a lecture he gave as Professor of Architecture to the Royal Academy of Arts, London in 1842.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2005. [1]

National Register of Historic Places Federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred in preserving the property.

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References

  1. 1 2 "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service. 2010-07-09.
  2. Edward Salo (March 2005). "Thompson House" (pdf). National Register of Historic Places - Nomination and Inventory. North Carolina State Historic Preservation Office. Retrieved 2015-06-01.