Thomson Head

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Location of German Peninsula in Graham Land, Antarctic Peninsula. Ant-pen-map-German.PNG
Location of German Peninsula in Graham Land, Antarctic Peninsula.

Thomson Head ( 67°35′S66°46′W / 67.583°S 66.767°W / -67.583; -66.767 Coordinates: 67°35′S66°46′W / 67.583°S 66.767°W / -67.583; -66.767 ) is a steep, rocky headland rising to 915 m at the east side of Bourgeois Fjord, between Perutz and Bader Glaciers, forming the north extremity of German Peninsula on Fallières Coast on the west side of Graham Land, Antarctica. First surveyed in 1936 by the British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE) under Rymill. Resurveyed in 1948-49 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) and named for William H. Thomson, FIDS air pilot at Stonington Island in 1947.

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Grotto Glacier is a glacier on the east coast of Alexander Island, Antarctica, which flows east into George VI Sound between Belemnite Point and Ablation Point. It is 46 km (29 mi) long, 6 km (4 mi) wide where it emerges from the coastal mountains, and 13 km (8.1 mi) wide at its mouth. It was first photographed from the air on 23 November 1935, by Lincoln Ellsworth and mapped from these photographs by W.L.G. Joerg. It was roughly surveyed in 1936 by the British Graham Land Expedition and resurveyed in 1949 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS). The glacier was so named by the FIDS because a sledge dog was rescued from a grotto-like crevasse in the glacier.

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Perutz Glacier is a glacier, 10 nautical miles (18 km) long and 2 nautical miles (3.7 km) wide, which flows west-northwest from Hemimont Plateau into Bourgeois Fjord, close east of Thomson Head, on the west coast of Graham Land, Antarctica. The mouth of the glacier was first surveyed in 1936 by the British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE) under Rymill. The entire glacier was surveyed in 1946-47 and 1948-49 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS), and named by them for Max F. Perutz of the Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge, who has made important studies on the mechanism of glacier flow.

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Sanctuary Islands is a group of small islands lying just off the west side of Chavez Island, 0.5 nautical miles (0.9 km) southwest of Link Stack, off the west coast of Graham Land. Charted by the British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE) under Rymill, 1934–37. So named by the United Kingdom Antarctic Place-Names Committee (UK-APC) in 1959 because these islands provided sheltered camping sites for Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) sledging parties from the Prospect Point station in 1957, and there are several small boat anchorages which were used by the British Naval Hydrographic Survey Unit's motor-launch in 1957–58.

Snowshoe Glacier is a glacier 8 nautical miles (15 km) long flowing west from a col in the southwest flank of Neny Glacier into Neny Fjord, western Graham Land. Roughly surveyed from the ground (1936) and photographed from the air (1937) by British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE). Surveyed by Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) in 1949. The name was suggested by K.S.P. Butler of the FIDS in 1948 because the shape of the glacier with its narrow head and wide mouth resembles a snowshoe.

Hoskins Peak is a peak 3 nautical miles (6 km) west of Contact Peak in southern Pourquoi Pas Island, Graham Land, Antarctica. It was mapped by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS) from surveys, 1956–59, and named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee for Arthur K. Hoskins, a FIDS geologist at Stonington Island in 1958 and Horseshoe Island in 1959.

The Kelvin Crests are a line of steep-sided elevations with ice-covered cliffs 5 nautical miles (9 km) long, on the north side of Airy Glacier near its junction with Forster Ice Piedmont on the west side of the Antarctic Peninsula. Roughly surveyed by the British Graham Land Expedition in 1936–37, they were photographed from the air by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition in 1947. They were surveyed from the ground, from the southwest only, by members of the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey, December 1958, and completely mapped by the United States Geological Survey, 1974. The feature was named by the UK Antarctic Place-Names Committee for William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin, a British physicist and engineer who made substantial improvements in the design of magnetic compasses, 1873–78, and invented the Thomson sounding machine in 1878.

Remus Glacier is a glacier, 8 nautical miles (15 km) long, which flows from the north slopes of Mount Lupa northwestward along the northeast side of the Blackwall Mountains into Providence Cove, Neny Fjord, on the west coast of Graham Land. The lower reaches of the glacier were first roughly surveyed in 1936 by the British Graham Land Expedition (BGLE) under Rymill. Resurveyed in 1948-49 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS), who so named it for its association with Romulus Glacier, whose head lies near the head of this glacier.

Robillard Glacier is a narrow glacier flowing east-northeast and entering the north side of the head of Solberg Inlet, on the east coast of Graham Land. It was discovered by members of East Base of the United States Antarctic Service (USAS), 1939–41, and was photographed from the air in 1947 by the Ronne Antarctic Research Expedition (RARE), under Ronne, and charted in 1948 by the Falkland Islands Dependencies Survey (FIDS). It was named by Ronne for Captain George Robillard, U.S. Navy, of the legal section of the Bureau of Ships, who assisted in gaining Congressional support which resulted in procuring the expedition ship.

References

PD-icon.svg This article incorporates  public domain material from the United States Geological Survey document: "Thomson Head".(content from the Geographic Names Information System )  OOjs UI icon edit-ltr-progressive.svg