Thorold baronets

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There have been four baronetcies created for members of the Thorold (pronounced "Thurrald", though the late Revd. Henry Croyland Thorold was insistent on the pronunciation "Thorough" [1] ) family of Lincolnshire, two in the Baronetage of England and two in the Baronetage of Great Britain. As of 2014 one creation is extant.

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The Thorold Baronetcy, of Marston in the County of Lincoln, was created in the Baronetage of England on 24 August 1642 for William Thorold. He fought as a Royalist in the Civil War and represented Grantham in the House of Commons after the Restoration. The fourth Baronet sat as Member of Parliament for Grantham and Lincolnshire. The ninth Baronet was Member of Parliament for Lincolnshire. The tenth Baronet was a noted book collector. The twelfth Baronet represented Grantham in Parliament. The fifteenth Baronet was a Captain in the Royal Navy and leader of the Lincolnshire County Council. [2] As of 28 February 2014 the present Baronet has not successfully proven his succession and is therefore not on the Official Roll of the Baronetage, with the baronetcy considered dormant since 1999. [3]

The family first came to Marston through the marriage of Sir Richard Thorold with the heiress of the de Marston family in the middle of the fourteenth century, in the middle of the fourteenth century, [4] The Right Reverend Anthony Wilson Thorold, son of Reverend Edward Thorold, fourth son of the ninth Baronet, was Bishop of Rochester and Bishop of Winchester.

The family seat was at Syston Park, near South Kesteven, Lincolnshire.

The Thorold Baronetcy, of Hough-on-the-Hill in the County of Lincoln, was created in the Baronetage of England on 14 June 1644 for Robert Thorold. The title became extinct on the death of the third Baronet in 1706.

The Thorold Baronetcy, of Harmston in the County of Lincoln, was created in the Baronetage of Great Britain on 9 September 1709 for George Thorold. The title became extinct on the death of the second Baronet in 1738. [5]

The Thorold Baronetcy, of Harmston in the County of Lincoln, was created in the Baronetage of Great Britain on 14 March 1740 for Nathaniel Thorold; he was the nephew of the baronets of the 1709 creation. The title became extinct on his death in 1764.

Thorold baronets, of Marston (1642)

Coat of arms of the Thorold baronets of Marston
Thorold Achievement.png
Crest A roebuck passant Argent attired Or
Blazon Sable three goats salient Argent
Motto Cervus Non Servus (The Stag Is Not A Slave) [6]

The heir apparent is the present holder's son Henry Lowry Thorold (born 1981).

Thorold baronets, of Hough-on-the-Hill (1644)

Thorold baronets, of Harmston (1709)

Thorold baronets, of Harmston (1740)

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Sir William Thorold, 1st Baronet (1591–1678) was an English landowner and politician who sat in the House of Commons from 1661 to 1677. He fought for the Royalist cause in the English Civil War.

Sir George Thorold, 1st Baronet of Harmston, Lincolnshire, was a leading London merchant.

Sir John Thorold, 4th Baronet of Marston Hall and Cranwell, Lincolnshire was an English politician. He was a Member of Parliament representing either Grantham or Lincolnshire in a number of parliaments between 1697 and 1715.

References

  1. "Society of Antiquaries of London - The Revd Henry Croyland Thorold, MLitt". Archived from the original on 20 March 2012. Retrieved 6 November 2014.
  2. George Edward Cokayne Complete Baronetage, Volume 2
  3. "The Official Roll of Baronets(as at 31st October 2014) » The Standing Council of the Baronetage -". baronetage.org. Archived from the original on 6 March 2015. Retrieved 6 November 2014.
  4. Thorold, Reverend Henry, F.S.A., "Marston Hall, Lincolnshire", printed University Press, Oxford.
  5. Cokayne, George Edward (1906) Complete Baronetage . Volume V. Exeter: W. Pollard & Co. LCCN   06-23564. p. 9
  6. Debrett's peerage, baronetage, knightage, and companionage. 1893.