Thracian tomb Golyama Arsenalka

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View from the antechamber Golyama arsenalka (2).JPG
View from the antechamber
View from the domed main chamber Golqma arsenalka 3.JPG
View from the domed main chamber

Golyama Arsenalka mound is a Thracian burial tumulus with a subterranean stone building near the Bulgarian town of Shipka. It dates from the end of 5th century BCE.

Thracians Indo-European people

The Thracians were a group of Indo-European tribes inhabiting a large area in Eastern and Southeastern Europe. They spoke the Thracian language – a scarcely attested branch of the Indo-European language family. The study of Thracians and Thracian culture is known as Thracology.

Tumulus Mound of earth and stones raised over graves

A tumulus is a mound of earth and stones raised over a grave or graves. Tumuli are also known as barrows, burial mounds or kurgans, and may be found throughout much of the world. A cairn, which is a mound of stones built for various purposes, may also originally have been a tumulus.

Bulgaria country in Southeast Europe

Bulgaria, officially the Republic of Bulgaria, is a country in Southeast Europe. It is bordered by Romania to the north, Serbia and North Macedonia to the west, Greece and Turkey to the south, and the Black Sea to the east. The capital and largest city is Sofia; other major cities are Plovdiv, Varna and Burgas. With a territory of 110,994 square kilometres (42,855 sq mi), Bulgaria is Europe's 16th-largest country.

It is composed of a representative façade, a small antechamber and a domed chamber. The entrances have been closed with double stone doors. The floor of the antechamber is made of rammed soil, while the domed chamber is made up of specially fitted stones. In the center of the domed chamber there is a circular granite block. On the floor underneath it is a cavity surrounded by a ring of stones resembling the cult fireplaces in Seutopolis. Opposite to the entrance, there is a bed with east-west orientation. The temple was used for a funeral of a ruler or a nobleman. It was robbed of its valuables in antiquity, but parts of a gilt breast plate, two small gold ornaments, and bones of horses were found during excavations in the antechamber.

Dome architectural element that resembles the hollow upper half of a sphere

A dome is an architectural element that resembles the hollow upper half of a sphere. The precise definition has been a matter of controversy. There are also a wide variety of forms and specialized terms to describe them. A dome can rest upon a rotunda or drum, and can be supported by columns or piers that transition to the dome through squinches or pendentives. A lantern may cover an oculus and may itself have another dome.

Granite A common type of intrusive, felsic, igneous rock with granular structure

Granite is a common type of felsic intrusive igneous rock that is granular and phaneritic in texture. Granites can be predominantly white, pink, or gray in color, depending on their mineralogy. The word "granite" comes from the Latin granum, a grain, in reference to the coarse-grained structure of such a holocrystalline rock. Strictly speaking, granite is an igneous rock with between 20% and 60% quartz by volume, and at least 35% of the total feldspar consisting of alkali feldspar, although commonly the term "granite" is used to refer to a wider range of coarse-grained igneous rocks containing quartz and feldspar.

Seuthopolis Ancient city

Seuthopolis was an ancient hellenistic-type city founded by the Thracian king Seuthes III between 325–315 BC and the capital of the Odrysian kingdom.

See also

Thracian Tomb of Kazanlak grave

The Thracian Tomb of Kazanlak is a vaulted-brickwork "beehive" (tholos) tomb near the town of Kazanlak in central Bulgaria.

Thracian tomb Shushmanets

The Thracian tomb at Shushmanets Mound is a masterpiece of Thracian architecture. It was built as a temple in the 4th century BC and later used as a tomb.

Thracian tomb Griffins

The Thracian tomb Griffins, found in Bulgaria, has a façade decorated with plastic columns and with a pediment above them. The pediment`s ends are semi-palmettes, the lower leaves of which are elongated and look like heads of griffins. The temple was built in the 5th century BC. There is a corridor made from river stones, floored with earth. The façade, the antechamber and the circular chamber are built of granite blocks. The entrances to the antechamber and the dome chamber had been closed by stone doors which were found broken during the research of the facility. The antechamber is of rectangular shape and has a double-pitched roof. The round chamber is covered with fine-made dome. The floors of both rooms are made of plastered granite slabs. Opposite the entrance of the circular chamber is situated a ritual stone bed with decorations. On a stone block in front of the bed were found gold paws. A funeral took place in the temple in the 4th century BC. The corridor was filled with river stones and soil. It was robbed in antiquity.

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Beehive tomb burial structure

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Gallery grave Form of megalithic tomb

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KV34 ancient Egyptian tomb

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Pyramid of Khendjer smooth-sided pyramid

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Maglizh Place

Maglizh is a town in Stara Zagora Province, South-central Bulgaria. It is the administrative centre of the homonymous Maglizh Municipality. As of December 2009, the town has a population of 3,426 inhabitants.

The Lohra tomb was a megalithic monument outside Lohra near Marburg in north central Hesse, Germany. It is one of the lesser known among its type in Central Europe. It dates to the late Neolithic, probably just after 3000 BC. It belongs to the gallery graves of the Wartberg culture, but is unique among them because of its rich ceramic assemblage.

Altendorf (megalithic tomb)

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Tomb of Lazarus

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Tombs of the Kings (Jerusalem)

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Mezek Place in Haskovo, Bulgaria

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Royal Tombs of Selca e Poshtme

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Tomb of Seuthes III grave of King Seuthes lll, located near Kazanlak, Bulgaria

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Ostrusha mound

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Thracian tomb Helvetia

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Valley of the Thracian Rulers Terminology for Kazanlak Valley

The Valley of the Thracian Rulers is a popular name which was made public by the archaeologist Georgi Kitov and describes the extremely high concentration and variety of monuments of the Thracian culture in the Kazanlak Valley. It is believed that there are over 1500 funeral mounds in the region, with only 300 being researched so far.

The Yaksu-ri rock-paintings tomb are located in Yaksu-ri, Kangso-gun, South Pyongan Province, North Korea.

Macedonian Tombs, Korinos

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Tholos do Barro Megalithic site near Sintra, Portugal

The Tholos do Barro was a Chalcolithic or Copper-Age domed tomb of block masonry. Its ruins are located on Monte da Pena, near the village of Barro, Torres Vedras municipality, in the Lisbon District of Portugal. The tholos was classified as a National Monument in September 1940.

References

Coordinates: 42°41′58.704″N25°18′33.48″E / 42.69964000°N 25.3093000°E / 42.69964000; 25.3093000

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.