Thracian tomb Shushmanets

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Outside view Shushmanets 1.jpg
Outside view
Panorama view Shushments2.jpg
Panorama view
Inside view Shushmanets3.jpg
Inside view

The Thracian tomb at Shushmanets is a mound located in the Valley of the Thracian Rulers. It was built as a temple in the 4th century BC and later used as a tomb. [1]

Contents

Architecture

The temple has a long and wide entry corridor and an antechamber, a semi-cylindrical room supported by an elegant column. The top of this column has the form of a knucklebone. Four horses and two dogs were sacrificed in the antechamber. The central room is circular in shape, supported by a beautiful polished Doric column ending with a large disc symbolizing the sun. The tomb's columns represent Thracian beliefs about the universe and the creation myth. Archaeologist Georgi Kitov discovered the tomb in 1996. [2]

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References

  1. "The Tomb in the "Shushmanets" Mound". Wikimapia. Retrieved July 15, 2013.
  2. "Thracian tomb in Shushmanets mound, Shipka". Guide Bulgaria. Retrieved July 15, 2013.