Thracian tomb Helvetia

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entrance of the tomb Helvecia (2).JPG
entrance of the tomb

The Thracian tomb "Helvetia" mound near Shipka, Bulgaria, was built in the middle of the 4th century BC.

Shipka (town) Place in Stara Zagora, Bulgaria

Shipka is a town in central Bulgaria, part of Kazanlak Municipality, Stara Zagora Province. It lies in the Central Balkan Mountains, at 42°42′N25°23′E, 650 metres above sea level. As of 2005, Shipka has a population of 1,398 and the mayor is Stoyan Ivanov.

Bulgaria country in Southeast Europe

Bulgaria, officially the Republic of Bulgaria, is a country in Southeast Europe. It is bordered by Romania to the north, Serbia and North Macedonia to the west, Greece and Turkey to the south, and the Black Sea to the east. The capital and largest city is Sofia; other major cities are Plovdiv, Varna and Burgas. With a territory of 110,994 square kilometres (42,855 sq mi), Bulgaria is Europe's 16th-largest country.

Contents

Construction

The walls of the tomb's entrance corridor are made of stone. After this corridor an antechamber is followed by a rectangular chamber with a unique covered ceiling. The ceiling is bent by the walls of both rooms, crossed by a horizontal zone. This marks the transition from the double-pitched, to the semi-cylindrical, ceiling of chambers in Thracian architecture. The floor of the tomb is plastered, and the walls of the antechamber and the other rooms were covered with a coating. Through the horizontal and vertical grooves, they were covered by large marble blocks. The chamber had a stone door that locked from the inside. Opposite the entrance, a ritual stone bed was located in the room. The last funeral that occurred in the antechamber is believed to be that of a horse.

Marble non-foliated metamorphic rock commonly used for sculpture and as a building material

Marble is a metamorphic rock composed of recrystallized carbonate minerals, most commonly calcite or dolomite. Marble is typically not foliated, although there are exceptions. In geology, the term "marble" refers to metamorphosed limestone, but its use in stonemasonry more broadly encompasses unmetamorphosed limestone. Marble is commonly used for sculpture and as a building material.

Horse Domesticated four-footed mammal from the equine family

The horse is one of two extant subspecies of Equus ferus. It is an odd-toed ungulate mammal belonging to the taxonomic family Equidae. The horse has evolved over the past 45 to 55 million years from a small multi-toed creature, Eohippus, into the large, single-toed animal of today. Humans began domesticating horses around 4000 BC, and their domestication is believed to have been widespread by 3000 BC. Horses in the subspecies caballus are domesticated, although some domesticated populations live in the wild as feral horses. These feral populations are not true wild horses, as this term is used to describe horses that have never been domesticated, such as the endangered Przewalski's horse, a separate subspecies, and the only remaining true wild horse. There is an extensive, specialized vocabulary used to describe equine-related concepts, covering everything from anatomy to life stages, size, colors, markings, breeds, locomotion, and behavior.

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References

See also

Thracian Tomb of Kazanlak grave

The Thracian Tomb of Kazanlak is a vaulted-brickwork "beehive" (tholos) tomb near the town of Kazanlak in central Bulgaria.

Thracian tomb Shushmanets

The Thracian tomb at Shushmanets Mound is a masterpiece of Thracian architecture. It was built as a temple in the 4th century BC and later used as a tomb.

Thracian tomb Griffins

The Thracian tomb Griffins, found in Bulgaria, has a façade decorated with plastic columns and with a pediment above them. The pediment`s ends are semi-palmettes, the lower leaves of which are elongated and look like heads of griffins. The temple was built in the 5th century BC. There is a corridor made from river stones, floored with earth. The façade, the antechamber and the circular chamber are built of granite blocks. The entrances to the antechamber and the dome chamber had been closed by stone doors which were found broken during the research of the facility. The antechamber is of rectangular shape and has a double-pitched roof. The round chamber is covered with fine-made dome. The floors of both rooms are made of plastered granite slabs. Opposite the entrance of the circular chamber is situated a ritual stone bed with decorations. On a stone block in front of the bed were found gold paws. A funeral took place in the temple in the 4th century BC. The corridor was filled with river stones and soil. It was robbed in antiquity.

Coordinates: 42°42′20.0154″N25°20′47.184″E / 42.705559833°N 25.34644000°E / 42.705559833; 25.34644000

Geographic coordinate system Coordinate system

A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters or symbols. The coordinates are often chosen such that one of the numbers represents a vertical position and two or three of the numbers represent a horizontal position; alternatively, a geographic position may be expressed in a combined three-dimensional Cartesian vector. A common choice of coordinates is latitude, longitude and elevation. To specify a location on a plane requires a map projection.