Three Steps to Heaven (song)

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"Three Steps to Heaven"
Eddie Cochran Three Steps To Heaven.jpg
Single by Eddie Cochran
from the album The Eddie Cochran Memorial Album
B-side "Cut Across Shorty"
ReleasedMarch 1960 (USA)
May 1960 (UK)
RecordedJanuary 8, 1960, Gold Star Studios, Hollywood, California
Genre Rock and roll, doo-wop, pop, country
Length2:21
Label Liberty 55242 (USA)
London HLG 9115 (UK) [1]
Songwriter(s) Eddie Cochran
Bob Cochran [1]
Producer(s) Snuff Garrett
Eddie Cochran singles chronology
"Hallelujah, I Love Her So"
(1959)
"Three Steps to Heaven"
(1960)
"Lonely"
(1960)

"Three Steps to Heaven" is a song co-written and recorded by Eddie Cochran, released in 1960. The record became a posthumous UK number-one hit for Cochran following his death in a car accident in April 1960. [1] In the US it did not reach the Billboard Hot 100.

Contents

"Three Steps To Heaven" was recorded in January 1960 and featured Buddy Holly's Crickets on instruments. The song was written by Eddie Cochran and his brother Bob Cochran. [1]

David Bowie used the guitar chord riff in his 1971 song "Queen Bitch" on his album Hunky Dory . He later made reference to the song title in the lyrics of "It's No Game" on 1980's Scary Monsters (And Super Creeps) .

Personnel

Chart performance

Chart (1960)Peak
position
Ireland Singles Chart1
Netherlands Singles Chart10
New Zealand Singles Chart6
Norway Singles Chart7
South African Singles Chart5
UK Singles Chart1

[3]

Cover versions

Showaddywaddy's 1975 cover version of this song was also a hit, reaching No. 1 in Ireland and No. 2 in the UK Singles Chart. [4]

See also

Related Research Articles

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My Way (Eddie Cochran song) 1963 single by Eddie Cochran

"My Way" is a song co-written and recorded by Eddie Cochran. It was recorded in January 1959 and released posthumously as a single on Liberty Records in April 1963. In the UK the single reached number 23 on the charts.

Sweetie Pie (song) 1960 single by Eddie Cochran

"Sweetie Pie" is a song written by Eddie Cochran, Jerry Capehart, and Johnny Russell and recorded by Eddie Cochran. It was recorded in 1957 and released posthumously as a single on Liberty F-55278 in August 1960. In the UK the single rose to number 38 on the charts. The U.S. release did not chart. The flip side, "Lonely", reached number 41 on the UK singles chart. Keld Heich has recorded the song in 2010.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 Rice, Jo (1982). The Guinness Book of 500 Number One Hits (1st ed.). Enfield, Middlesex: Guinness Superlatives Ltd. pp. 50–1. ISBN   0-85112-250-7.
  2. "Eddie Cochran 1956 Sessions on www.eddiecochran.info". Eddiecochran.info. Retrieved 2014-04-04.
  3. "Song artist 763 - Eddie Cochran". Tsort.info. Retrieved 2014-04-04.
  4. Roberts, David (2006). British Hit Singles & Albums (19th ed.). London: Guinness World Records Limited. p. 497. ISBN   1-904994-10-5.