Three Worlds (Escher)

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Three Worlds
Three Worlds.jpg
Artist M. C. Escher
Year1955
Type lithograph
Dimensions36.2 cm× 24.7 cm(14.3 in× 9.7 in)

Three Worlds is a lithograph print by the Dutch artist M. C. Escher first printed in December 1955.

Contents

Three Worlds depicts a large pool or lake during the autumn or winter months, the title referring to the three visible perspectives in the picture: the surface of the water on which leaves float, the world above the surface, observable by the water's reflection of a forest, and the world below the surface, observable in the large fish swimming just below the water's surface.

Escher also created a picture named Two Worlds.

See also

Sources


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