Tiarosporella urbis-rosarum

Last updated

Tiarosporella urbis-rosarum
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Fungi
Division: Ascomycota
Class: Pezizomycotina
Order: Leotiomycetes
Family: Leotiomycetidae
Genus: Tiarosporella
Species:T. urbis-rosarum
Binomial name
Tiarosporella urbis-rosarum
Jami et al., 2012

Tiarosporella urbis-rosarum is an endophytic fungus that might be a latent pathogen. It was found on Acacia karroo , a common tree in southern Africa. [1]

Endophyte

An endophyte is an endosymbiont, often a bacterium or fungus, that lives within a plant for at least part of its life cycle without causing apparent disease. Endophytes are ubiquitous and have been found in all species of plants studied to date; however, most of the endophyte/plant relationships are not well understood. Some endophytes may enhance host growth, nutrient acquisition and improve the plant's ability to tolerate abiotic stresses, such as drought, and decrease biotic stresses by enhancing plant resistance to insects, pathogens and herbivores.

Contents

Related Research Articles

<i>Acacia sensu lato</i>

Acacia s.l., known commonly as mimosa, acacia, thorntree or wattle, is a polyphyletic genus of shrubs and trees belonging to the subfamily Mimosoideae of the family Fabaceae. It was described by the Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus in 1773 based on the African species Acacia nilotica. Many non-Australian species tend to be thorny, whereas the majority of Australian acacias are not. All species are pod-bearing, with sap and leaves often bearing large amounts of tannins and condensed tannins that historically found use as pharmaceuticals and preservatives.

<i>Vachellia nilotica</i> species of plant

Vachellia nilotica is a tree in the family Fabaceae. It is native to Africa, the Middle East and the Indian subcontinent. It is also a Weed of National Significance and is an invasive species of significant concern in Australia.

<i>Vachellia karroo</i> species of plant

Vachellia karroo, commonly known as the Sweet thorn, is a species of acacia, native to southern Africa from southern Angola east to Mozambique, and south to South Africa.

<i>Botryosphaeria dothidea</i> species of fungus

Botryosphaeria dothidea Ces. & De Not. is a plant pathogen that causes the formation of cankers on a wide variety of tree and shrub species. It has been reported on several hundred plant hosts and on all continents except Antarctica. B. dothidea was redefined in 2004, and some reports of its host range from prior to that time likely include species that have since been placed in another genus. Even so, B. dothidea has since been identified on a number of woody plants—including grape, mango, olive, eucalyptus, maple, and oak, among others—and is still expected to have a broad geographical distribution. While it is best known as a pathogen, the species has also been identified as an endophyte, existing in association with plant tissues on which disease symptoms were not observed. It can colonize some fruits, in addition to woody tissues.

Mohol bushbaby species of mammal

The Mohol bushbaby is a species of primate in the family Galagidae which is native to mesic woodlands of the southern Afrotropics. It is physically very similar to the Senegal bushbaby, and was formerly considered to be its southern race. The two species differ markedly in their biology however, and no hybrids have been recorded in captivity.

<i>Vachellia</i> genus of plants

Vachellia is a genus of flowering plants in the legume family, Fabaceae, commonly known as thorn trees or acacias. It belongs to the subfamily Mimosoideae. Its species were considered members of genus Acacia until 2009. Vachellia can be distinguished from other acacias by its capitate inflorescences and spinescent stipules. Before discovery of the New World, Europeans in the Mediterranean region were familiar with several species of Vachellia, which they knew as sources of medicine, and had names for them that they inherited from the Greeks and Romans.

<i>Senegalia caffra</i> Afrotropical species of Acacia

Senegalia caffra, also known as hook-thorn or Acacia caffra, is a tree that occurs commonly in southern Africa. Though it is cultivated, it often occurs naturally in Gauteng suburban gardens, together with Acacia karroo and Acacia robusta.

Aplosporella yalgorensis is an endophytic fungus that might be a canker pathogen, specifically for Eucalyptus gomphocephala. It was isolated from said trees in Western Australia.

Pseudofusicoccum adansoniae is an endophytic fungus that might be a canker pathogen, specifically for Adansonia gibbosa (baobab). It was isolated from said trees, as well as surrounding ones, in the Kimberley.

Pseudofusicoccum ardesiacum is an endophytic fungus that might be a canker pathogen, specifically for Adansonia gibbosa (baobab). It was isolated from said trees, as well as surrounding ones, in the Kimberley.

Pseudofusicoccum kimberleyense is an endophytic fungus that might be a canker pathogen, specifically for Adansonia gibbosa (baobab). It was isolated from said trees, as well as surrounding ones, in the Kimberley.

Neoscytalidium novaehollandiae is an endophytic fungus that might be a canker pathogen, specifically for Adansonia gibbosa (baobab). It was isolated from said trees, as well as surrounding ones, in the Kimberley.

Lasiodiplodia margaritacea is an endophytic fungus that might be a canker pathogen, specifically for Adansonia gibbosa (baobab). It was isolated from said trees, as well as surrounding ones, in the Kimberley.

Fusicoccum ramosum is an endophytic fungus that might be a canker pathogen, specifically for Adansonia gibbosa (baobab). It was isolated from said trees, as well as surrounding ones, in the Kimberley.

Dothiorella longicollis is an endophytic fungus that might be a canker pathogen, specifically for Adansonia gibbosa (baobab). It was isolated from said trees, as well as surrounding ones, in the Kimberley.

Ceratocystis zombamontana is a plant-pathogenic saprobic fungal species first found in Africa, infecting Acacia mearnsii and Eucalyptus species.

Diplodia allocellula is an endophytic fungus that might be a latent pathogen. It was found on Acacia karroo, a common tree in southern Africa.

Dothiorella dulcispinae is an endophytic fungus that might be a latent pathogen. It was found on Acacia karroo, a common tree in southern Africa.

Dothiorella brevicollis is an endophytic fungus that might be a latent pathogen. It was found on Acacia karroo, a common tree in southern Africa.

Spencermartinsia pretoriensis is an endophytic fungus that might be a latent pathogen. It was found on Acacia karroo, a common tree in southern Africa.

References

  1. Jami, Fahimeh; Slippers, Bernard; Wingfield, Marieka J.; Gryzenhout, Mike (2012). "Five New Species of the Botryosphaeriaceae from Acacia Karroo in South Africa". Cryptogamie, Mycologie. 33 (3): 245–266. doi:10.7872/crym.v33.iss3.2012.245. hdl:2263/21285. ISSN   0181-1584.

Further reading

<i>Encyclopedia of Life</i> collaborative project intended to create an encyclopedia documenting all living species known to science

The Encyclopedia of Life (EOL) is a free, online collaborative encyclopedia intended to document all of the 1.9 million living species known to science. It is compiled from existing databases and from contributions by experts and non-experts throughout the world. It aims to build one "infinitely expandable" page for each species, including video, sound, images, graphics, as well as text. In addition, the Encyclopedia incorporates content from the Biodiversity Heritage Library, which digitizes millions of pages of printed literature from the world's major natural history libraries. The project was initially backed by a US$50 million funding commitment, led by the MacArthur Foundation and the Sloan Foundation, who provided US$20 million and US$5 million, respectively. The additional US$25 million came from five cornerstone institutions—the Field Museum, Harvard University, the Marine Biological Laboratory, the Missouri Botanical Garden, and the Smithsonian Institution. The project was initially led by Jim Edwards and the development team by David Patterson. Today, participating institutions and individual donors continue to support EOL through financial contributions.