Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy

Last updated
Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy
Type Non-profit NGO
Location
Key people
Lobsang Nyandak
Website tchrd.org

The Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy (TCHRD) is a Tibetan non-governmental nonprofit human rights organization.

Contents

The TCHRD investigates and reports on human rights issues in Tibet and among Tibetan minorities throughout China. [1] [2] It is the first Tibetan non-governmental human rights organization to be established in exile in India. [3] [4] [5] The TCHRD publishes articles on censorship and discrimination faced by Tibetans in Tibet; keeps databases on Tibetan political prisoners in China, Tibetans who have self-immolated, and Tibetans who have died in detention; and publishes reports and yearly human rights updates. The TCHRD has emphasized that an "important source of support for the Tibetan people comes from the Chinese community from both within and outside China." [6]

Lobsang Nyandak, President of the Tibet Fund and former Representative to the Americas for the Dalai Lama, was the founding Executive Director. [7]

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References

  1. "Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy (TCHRD)". tibet.org. Tibet Online. Retrieved 13 December 2018.
  2. "Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy". hrwa.cul.columbia.edu. Columbia University, Human Rights Web Archive. Retrieved 13 December 2018.
  3. "Tibetan Center for Human Rights and Democracy". sourcewatch.org. The Center for Media and Democracy Source Watch. Retrieved 13 December 2018.
  4. Pinto, Kenya-Jade (September 6, 2016). "Victoria: My summer at the Tibetan Centre for Human Rights and Democracy". Level, leveljustice.org. Retrieved 13 December 2018.
  5. Palden, Tenzin (December 16, 2016). "A Worthy Learning Experience at TCHRD". Envision, Empowering the Vision Project. Retrieved 13 December 2018.
  6. Tashi, T. (July 18, 2011). "TCHRD Organises Workshop on Human Rights and Democracy at Mundgod Tibetan Settlement". Central Tibetan Administration. Retrieved 13 December 2018.
  7. "Emory-Tibet Partnership, The Visit 2013". Emory University. Retrieved 22 October 2019.