Tibor

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Tibor is a masculine given name found throughout Europe. [1]

There are several explanations for the origin of the name:

Some notable men known by this name include:

See also

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References

  1. Hanks, Patrick, ed. (2003). Dictionary of American Family Names: 3-Volume Set. 3. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. p. 475. ISBN   978-0-19-508137-4. OCLC   51655476 . Retrieved 17 January 2021.