Tifton, Thomasville and Gulf Railway

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The Tifton, Thomasville and Gulf Railway was chartered on June 26, 1897 and operated from Tifton, GA to Thomasville, GA in 1900. The TT&G was consolidated with the Atlantic and Birmingham Railroad and the Tifton and Northeastern Railroad on December 3, 1903 to form the Atlantic and Birmingham Railway. It then became part of the Atlanta, Birmingham and Atlantic Railroad when it took over the A&B on April 12, 1906.

The Tifton and Northeastern Railroad was chartered on October 15, 1891 and built a 25-mile line from Tifton, Georgia, United States to Fitzgerald, Georgia in 1896. The T&N was consolidated with the Atlantic and Birmingham Railroad and the Tifton, Thomasville and Gulf Railway on December 3, 1903 to form the Atlantic and Birmingham Railway. It then became part of the Atlanta, Birmingham and Atlantic Railroad when it took over the A&B on April 12, 1906.

The Atlantic and Birmingham Railway was originally chartered in 1887 as the Waycross Air Line Railroad. In 1901, the original charter was amended for an extension to Birmingham and the railroad's name was changed to the Atlantic and Birmingham Railroad. Two years later, the A&B merged with the Tifton and Northeastern Railroad and the Tifton, Thomasville and Gulf Railway and was renamed the Atlantic and Birmingham Railway. In March, 1904, the A&B purchased the Brunswick and Birmingham Railway. In 1906, the A&B was purchased and merged into the Atlanta, Birmingham and Atlantic Railroad.


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