Tiger team

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A tiger team is composed of specialists assembled to work on a specific goal [1] or to solve a particular problem. [2]

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Term

A 1964 paper entitled Program Management in Design and Development used the term tiger teams and defined it as "a team of undomesticated and uninhibited technical specialists, selected for their experience, energy, and imagination, and assigned to track down relentlessly every possible source of failure in a spacecraft subsystem or simulation". [2] The paper consists of anecdotes and answers to questions from a panel on improving issues in program management concerning testing and quality assurance in aerospace vehicle development and production. [3] One of the authors was Walter C. Williams, an engineer at the Manned Spacecraft Center and part of the Edwards Air Force Base National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics. Williams suggests that tiger teams are an effective and useful method for advancing the reliability of systems and subsystems in the context of actual flight environments. Jane Goodall, Liam Hunt and Kate Herron, among others, have noted that tigers are not naturally cooperative animals and have suggested referring to “chimpanzee teams” because of the intense cooperation that occurs in chimpanzee social groups.[ citation needed ]

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References

  1. Miller, Marilyn; Armon, Rick (June 6, 2016). "University of Akron announces new "Tiger Team" to address enrollment slide, finances, leadership issues". Akron Beacon Journal. Akron Beacon Journal/Ohio.com. Retrieved 18 October 2016.
  2. 1 2 J. R. Dempsey, W. A. Davis, A. S. Crossfield, and Walter C. Williams, "Program Management in Design and Development," in Third Annual Aerospace Reliability and Maintainability Conference, Society of Automotive Engineers, 1964, p. 7–8
  3. "Login - SAE Mobilus". saemobilus.sae.org.
  4. "Apollo 13 Accident". nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov.
  5. "Gene Kranz A Blast from The Past" (PDF). Retrieved August 29, 2017.
  6. 1 2 Laakso, Marko; Takanen, Ari; Röning, Juha (1999). "The vulnerability process: a tiger team approach to resolving vulnerability cases". Proc. 11th FIRST Conf. Computer Security Incident Handling and Response. Brisbane, Australia: CiteSeerX: 1–2, 6. CiteSeerX   10.1.1.39.9438 .
  7. Ziemer, P. L. (1992-01-01). "The Department of Energy Tiger Teams; analysis of findings and plans for the future". 8. International Congress of the International Radiation Protection Association (Irpa8).
  8. "Benefits of a One NASA Organization in Solving Program and Project Technical Issues". Lessons Learned. NASA. 2004-05-07. Archived from the original on 6 March 2016. Retrieved 6 November 2015.

This article is based on material taken from the Free On-line Dictionary of Computing prior to 1 November 2008 and incorporated under the "relicensing" terms of the GFDL, version 1.3 or later.