Timeline of Continuity IRA actions

Last updated

This is a chronology of activities by the Continuity Irish Republican Army (CIRA), an Irish republican paramilitary group. The group started operations in 1994, after the Provisional Irish Republican Army began a ceasefire.

Contents

Note: All actions listed took place within Northern Ireland, unless stated otherwise.

1994

1995

1996

1997

1998

Note: for some of the incidents in 1998, it is unclear whether the Continuity IRA, the Real IRA, or both organizations were responsible: [14] [15] [16]

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

It has come to our attention that members of the Alan Ryan gang are now working with a Limerick gang styling itself Continuity IRA, which threatened Dublin criminals. We will be pursuing the extortionists no matter where they try and hide themselves. We want no more excuses — you have five working days to hand the extortionists over to us or face the inevitable consequences. There will be no intimidation by the Limerick gang.

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

See also

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