To Brighton with Gladys

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To Brighton with Gladys
Directed by George King
Written by John Quin
H.M. Raleigh
Eliot Stannard
Produced byHarry Cohen
Starring Harry Milton
Constance Shotter
Kate Cutler
Production
company
George King Productions
Distributed by Fox Film Company
Release date
February 1933
Running time
45 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

To Brighton with Gladys is a 1933 British comedy film directed by George King and starring Harry Milton, Constance Shotter and Kate Cutler. It was made at Ealing Studios as a quota quickie. [1]

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References

  1. Wood p.76

Bibliography