Tokyo 9th district (1890–1898)

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Tokyo 9th district was a constituency of the House of Representatives in the Imperial Diet of Japan (national legislature) between 1890 and 1898. It was located in Tokyo and consisted of Tokyo City's Koishikawa, Ushigome and Yotsuya wards.

After losing narrowly in 1890, former Tokyo prefectural representative Hatoyama Kazuo represented Tokyo 9th district from the 1892 election until its dissolution in 1902. He was unchallenged in the 1894 and 1898 elections.

Election results

August 1898 [1]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Kensei Hontō Hatoyama Kazuo 250
March 1898 [2]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Shimpotō Hatoyama Kazuo 160
September 1894 [3]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Rikken Kaishintō Hatoyama Kazuo 142
March 1894 [4]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Rikken Kaishintō Hatoyama Kazuo 136
1892 [5]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Rikken Kaishintō [6] Hatoyama Kazuo 65
Shiraishi Tsuyoshi46
Other candidates1
1890 [7]
PartyCandidateVotes%±%
Taiseikai (pro-Meiji-oligarchy/government) Yoshino Tsugutsune 58
Kaishintō (from the Popular Rights Movement) Hatoyama Kazuo 54
Ugawa Seisaburō 45
Other candidates6

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References

  1. 衆議院>第6回衆議院議員選挙>東京都>東京9区. JANJAN ザ・選挙 (in Japanese). Retrieved 2010-01-24.
  2. 衆議院>第5回衆議院議員選挙>東京都>東京9区. JANJAN ザ・選挙 (in Japanese). Retrieved 2010-01-24.
  3. 衆議院>第4回衆議院議員選挙>東京都>東京9区. JANJAN ザ・選挙 (in Japanese). Retrieved 2010-01-24.
  4. 衆議院>第3回衆議院議員選挙>東京都>東京9区. JANJAN ザ・選挙 (in Japanese). Retrieved 2010-01-24.
  5. 衆議院>第2回衆議院議員選挙>東京都>東京9区. JANJAN ザ・選挙 (in Japanese). Retrieved 2010-01-24.
  6. Kaishintō's parliamentary group was named giin shūkaijo (議員集会所, "Representatives' assembly hall")
  7. 衆議院>第1回衆議院議員選挙>東京都>東京9区. JANJAN ザ・選挙 (in Japanese). Retrieved 2010-01-24.