Tone stack

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A tone stack is a specialized type of audio filter incorporated into the circuit of an audio amplifier for altering the frequency response of the amplifier. The term is primarily used in reference to instrument amplifiers such as guitar amplifiers. [1]

The 5F6-A tone stack gives the performer the ability to control the amplifiers frequency response. ...we analyze, the tone stack circuit by first developing some convenient, approximate formulas for specific frequencies that can be used without special software. [2]

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A bass amplifier or "bass amp" is a musical instrument electronic device that uses electrical power to make lower-pitched instruments such as the bass guitar or double bass loud enough to be heard by the performers and audience. Bass amps typically consist of a preamplifier, tone controls, a power amplifier and one or more loudspeakers ("drivers") in a cabinet.

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Guitar speaker

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In electronics, a transimpedance amplifier (TIA) is a current to voltage converter, almost exclusively implemented with one or more operational amplifiers. The TIA can be used to amplify the current output of Geiger–Müller tubes, photo multiplier tubes, accelerometers, photo detectors and other types of sensors to a usable voltage. Current to voltage converters are used with sensors that have a current response that is more linear than the voltage response. This is the case with photodiodes where it is not uncommon for the current response to have better than 1% nonlinearity over a wide range of light input. The transimpedance amplifier presents a low impedance to the photodiode and isolates it from the output voltage of the operational amplifier. In its simplest form a transimpedance amplifier has just a large valued feedback resistor, Rf. The gain of the amplifer is set by this resistor and because the amplifier is in an inverting configuration, has a value of -Rf. There are several different configurations of transimpedance amplifiers, each suited to a particular application. The one factor they all have in common is the requirement to convert the low-level current of a sensor to a voltage. The gain, bandwidth, as well as current and voltage offsets change with different types of sensors, requiring different configurations of transimpedance amplifiers.

Equalization (audio) process of adjusting the balance between frequency components within an electronic signal

Equalization is the process of adjusting the balance between frequency components within an electronic signal. The most well known use of equalization is in sound recording and reproduction but there are many other applications in electronics and telecommunications. The circuit or equipment used to achieve equalization is called an equalizer. These devices strengthen or weaken the energy of specific frequency bands or "frequency ranges".

Fuzz bass

Fuzz bass, also called "bass overdrive" or "bass distortion", is a style of playing the electric bass or modifying its signal that produces a buzzy, distorted, overdriven sound, which the name implies in an onomatopoetic fashion. Overdriving a bass signal significantly changes the timbre, adds higher overtones (harmonics), increases the sustain, and, if the gain is turned up high enough, creates a "breaking up" sound characterized by a growling, buzzy tone.

References

  1. Pittman, Aspen (September 2003). The Tube Amp Book. Hal Leonard Corporation. ISBN   9780879307677 . Retrieved 3 April 2013.
  2. Kuehnel, Richard (2009). The Fender Bassman 5F6-A (3 ed.). Seattle: AMP Books, LLC. pp. 63–86. ISBN   9780976982258 . Retrieved 9 April 2021.