Tonga at the 2004 Summer Paralympics

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Tonga at the
2004 Summer Paralympics
Flag of Tonga.svg
IPC code TGA
NPC Tonga National Paralympic Committee
in Athens
Competitors 1 in 1 sport
Medals
Gold
0
Silver
0
Bronze
0
Total
0
Summer Paralympics appearances

Tonga sent a delegation to compete at the 2004 Summer Paralympics in Athens, Greece. The country was represented by a single athlete, Alailupe Valeti (also referred to as Alailupe Tualau), who competed in a shot put event for visually impaired athletes. [1] [2]

Tonga country in Oceania

Tonga, officially the Kingdom of Tonga, is a Polynesian country and archipelago comprising 169 islands, of which 36 are inhabited. The total surface area is about 750 square kilometres (290 sq mi) scattered over 700,000 square kilometres (270,000 sq mi) of the southern Pacific Ocean. The sovereign state has a population of 100,651 people, of whom 70% reside on the main island of Tongatapu.

2004 Summer Paralympics

The 2004 Summer Paralympics, the 12th Summer Paralympic Games, were a major international multi-sport event for athletes with disabilities governed by the International Paralympic Committee, held in Athens, Greece from 17 September to 28 September 2004. 3,806 athletes from 136 National Paralympic Committees competed. 519 medal events were held in 19 sports.

Athens Capital and largest city of Greece

Athens is the capital and largest city of Greece. Athens dominates the Attica region and is one of the world's oldest cities, with its recorded history spanning over 3,400 years and its earliest human presence starting somewhere between the 11th and 7th millennium BC.

Contents

Athletics

NameEventResultRank
Alailupe Valeti Women's Shot Put F12 7.48 m 10th (out of 11)

See also

Tonga at the Paralympics

Tonga first participated at the Paralympic Games in 2000, and has sent athletes to compete in every Summer Paralympic Games since then. The country has never taken part in the Winter Paralympics.

Tonga at the 2004 Summer Olympics

Tonga competed at the 2004 Summer Olympics in Athens, Greece, from 13 to 29 August 2004.

Related Research Articles

Athletics at the 2004 Summer Paralympics included 17 events for men and 15 events for women, in 5 disciplines. Athletes competed in one of four disability categories:

Individual Olympic Athletes at the 2000 Summer Olympics

Four athletes from East Timor competed as Individual Olympic Athletes at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney, Australia.

Tonga at the Olympics

Tonga has competed in eight editions of the Olympic Summer Games and two of the Olympic Winter Games. Tonga became the smallest independent nation to have won an Olympic medal in the Summer games when Super Heavyweight Boxer Paea Wolfgramm earned silver in the 1996 Super heavyweight 91 kg championships in Atlanta.

Tonga at the 2008 Summer Olympics

Tonga competed at the 2008 Summer Olympics, that celebrated in Beijing, China, from August 8 to August 24, 2008. Tonga was represented by the Tonga Sports Association and National Olympic Committee, and was one of 117 nations that won no medals at the Games. Tonga was represented by three athletes competing in two sports–Aisea Tohi and Ana Po'uhila in track and field events, and Maamaloa Lolohea in weightlifting. The delegation's appearance at the Olympics marked its seventh consecutive appearance at the Olympics since its debut at the 1984 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles. The flag bearer for Tonga in Beijing was field athlete Ana Po'uhila.

Tonga at the 2008 Summer Paralympics

Tonga sent a delegation to compete at the 2008 Summer Paralympics in Beijing, China.

Tonga at the 2000 Summer Paralympics

Tonga sent a delegation to compete at the 2000 Summer Paralympics in Sydney, Australia. The country was represented by a single athlete, Alailupe Valeti, who competed in the discus and in the shot put, in events for visually impaired athletes. It was Tonga's first participation in the Paralympic Games.

Samoa at the 2004 Summer Paralympics

Samoa competed at the 2004 Summer Paralympics in Athens. The country was represented by two athletes, both competing in track and field. Neither won a medal.

Kyrgyzstan at the Paralympics

Kyrgyzstan made its Paralympic Games début at the 1996 Summer Paralympics in Atlanta, and has competed in every edition of the Summer Paralympics since then - albeit with delegations consisting in no more than three athletes. Kyrgyzstan made its début at the Winter Paralympics in 2014 in Sochi.

Serbia and Montenegro at the Paralympics

The Union of Serbia and Montenegro only competed at the Paralympic Games under that name at the 2004 Summer Paralympics in Athens. In 1992, its athletes competed as Independent Paralympic Participants. From 1996 to 2000, included, it was officially known as the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia. The International Paralympic Committee lists the country as "Yugoslavia" up to 2000, included, and considers that "Serbia and Montenegro" participated only in 2004. In 2006, the Union split into two sovereign countries, henceforth competing separately as Serbia and Montenegro.

Yugoslavia at the Paralympics

Yugoslavia made its Paralympic Games début at the 1972 Summer Paralympics in Heidelberg. It did not compete at the 1976 Summer Games, but did take part in the inaugural Winter Paralympics that year in Örnsköldsvik. In 1980, 1984 and 1988, it took part in both the Summer and Winter Games.

Zambia at the Paralympics

Zambia made its Paralympic Games début at the 1996 Summer Paralympics in Atlanta, with a single athlete competing in men's track and field. In 2000, Zambia had two representatives, once more in track and field. The country was absent from the 2004 Games, but sent one representative in 2008.

Philippines at the Paralympics

The Philippines made its Paralympic Games debut at the 1988 Summer Paralympics in Seoul and has been fielding athletes up to the 2016 Rio de Janeiro Paralympic Games. Powerlifter Adeline Dumapong won her country's first Paralympic medal when she took the bronze medal in the Up to 82.5 kg event, lifting 110 kg in the 2000 Sydney Paralympic Games.

East Timor at the Paralympics

East Timor first sent competitors to the Paralympic Games for the 2000 Summer Games in Sydney. The country at that time was not yet recognised as a sovereign state, and its athletes participated as "Individual Paralympic Athletes". There were only two: Alcino Pereira in track & field, in the men's 5,000m race ; and Mateus Lukas in men's powerlifting, in the up to 48 kg category. Pereira failed to complete his race, while Lukas lifted 105 kg, finishing 13th and last of the athletes who successfully lifted a weight in his category.

Liechtenstein at the 2004 Summer Paralympics

Liechtenstein competed at the 2004 Summer Paralympics in Athens, Greece. The team included 1 athlete, but won no medals. Peter Frommelt, who had previously competed in 1988 and 1992, took part in the Table Tennis Men's Singles 8 event reaching the semi-finals.

Tonga at the 2012 Summer Paralympics

Tonga participated in the 2012 Summer Paralympics in London, United Kingdom, from August 29 to September 9, 2012. Their participation marked their fourth consecutive Summer Paralympics appearance since their début at the 2000 Summer Paralympics in Sydney. Tonga was represented by the Tonga National Paralympic Committee, and was one of the 45 participating countries that sent only a single athlete. Tonga has always sent only a single athlete from Sydney 2000 to London 2012. Tonga National Paralympic Committee sent a delegation of three people, including one athlete. The sole athlete to represent the nation was ʻAloʻalo Liku, who participated in javelin and discus throw. Liku was the country's flag-bearer during the Games' opening ceremony. Tonga did not win a medal at these Games, however Liku finished with seasonal bests in both the events.

Tonga at the 2016 Summer Paralympics

Tonga competed at the 2016 Summer Paralympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from 7 September to 18 September 2016.

Independent Paralympians at the Paralympic Games

Athletes have competed as Independent Paralympians at the Paralympic Games for various reasons, including political transition, international sanctions, suspensions of National Paralympic Committees and compassion.

References