Tonna melanostoma

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Tonna melanostoma
Scientific classification
Kingdom:
Phylum:
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(unranked):
Superfamily:
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Genus:
Species:
T. melanostoma
Binomial name
Tonna melanostoma
(Jay, 1839)
Synonyms

Dolium melanostomaJay, 1839

Tonna melanostoma is a species of large sea snail, a marine gastropod mollusc in the family Tonnidae, the tun shells.

Distribution

This species occurs off New Zealand [1]

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References

  1. Powell A. W. B. (1979). William Collins Publishers Ltd, Auckland ISBN   0-00-216906-1.