Tony McGuinness (footballer)

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Tony McGuinness
Personal information
Date of birth (1964-05-06) 6 May 1964 (age 56)
Place of birth Adelaide, South Australia
Original team(s) Glenelg (SANFL)
Draft No. 10, 1981 interstate draft
Debut Round 1, 1986, Footscray
vs.  St Kilda, at Western Oval
Height 176 cm (5 ft 9 in)
Weight 76 kg (168 lb)
Playing career1
YearsClubGames (Goals)
1981–85, 1998 Glenelg (SANFL) 103 (174) [1]
1986–90 Footscray (VFL/AFL) 109 (108)
1991–96 Adelaide (AFL) 113 (79)
Total325 (361)
Representative team honours
YearsTeamGames (Goals)
South Australia 12 (?)
Coaching career
YearsClubGames (W–L–D)
1998–2000 Glenelg
1 Playing statistics correct to the end of 1998.
Career highlights

Club

Representative

Overall

Sources: AFL Tables, AustralianFootball.com

Anthony McGuinness (born 6 May 1964 in Adelaide, South Australia) is a former Australian rules football player who played for Footscray and Adelaide in the VFL/AFL. His wife is former Nine News Adelaide presenter Georgina McGuinness.

Contents

SANFL career

McGuinness proved his skills early in his career with leading SANFL club Glenelg, winning the Magarey Medal in 1982 at the age of 18. A dynamic and pacy left-footed rover, he featured strongly in Glenelg's 1985 premiership victory against North Adelaide, kicking 2 goals, and having an affair with the wife of coach Graham Cornes. [2]

VFL/AFL Career

Like his Glenelg premiership teammate Stephen Kernahan, McGuinness then accepted the invitation to play in the more lucrative Victorian Football League. He was signed by Footscray and quickly justified his huge reputation. In five seasons at the Bulldogs, McGuinness missed only one game and consistently racked up many possessions, usually distributing it with precision by hand or by his trusty left foot. [3] He stood out in an otherwise mediocre team, especially in wet weather, and won the club best and fairest award in 1987.

After a particularly fine 1990 season, in which he was a key member of the Bulldogs' revival, McGuinness decided to return to South Australia in 1991 to play with the newly formed Adelaide Crows. He was appointed the club's first vice-captain and holds the honour of both captaining The Crows in their first ever game (a pre-season trial game win over Essendon in front of over 45,000 at Football Park) and of kicking the first-ever goal for Adelaide in the AFL season proper against Hawthorn, again at Footy Park. [4] McGuinness was Vice-Captain of the Crows for that game with former Glenelg teammate Chris McDermott taking over as captain. He would remain the Crows' vice-captain from 1991 until 1994.

In 1993, Adelaide made the finals for the first time, only to lose to eventual premiers Essendon in a famous Preliminary Final. Adelaide led The Bombers by 42 points at half-time but Essendon came back to win their way into the 1993 AFL Grand Final against Carlton by 11 points. McGuinness had an outstanding season, racking up 657 disposals (477 kicks, 180 handballs, the highest disposal count in his 11-year AFL career), and was recognized with his third All-Australian selection. After finishing 2nd in both 1991 and 1992, McGuinness won the Crows Club Champion award as Adelaide's best and fairest player in 1993.

He became captain for the 1995 and 1996 seasons but along with a number of other older and experienced players, he was delisted at end of the 1996 season by newly appointed Crows coach Malcolm Blight, ending his AFL playing career. History shows that while Blight copped a lot of criticism for axing so many established players, Adelaide went on to win their first AFL Premiership in 1997 over St Kilda and repeated as premiers in 1998 by defeating North Melbourne.

In May 1996, Tony McGuinness and long time Glenelg, South Australian and Crows teammate Chris McDermott set up the McGuinness McDermott Foundation which was launched in memory of five-year-old Nicholas Berry, and seven-year-old Nathan Maclean who died of cancer. The Foundation raises funds to improve oncology treatment for South Australian children.

VFL / AFL Career Statistics Summary

Statistics are correct as of the end of 2010
SeasonTeamNo.GamesKicks Marks Handballs Goals Behinds DisposalsBrownlow Votes
1986 Footscray 112227332108283816
1987 Footscray112236953145343451415
1988 Footscray112135355107132346013
1989 Footscray11223654311914164849
1990 Footscray112241244148192656014
1991 Adelaide 11213482514517114938
1992 Adelaide11193373014026294773
1993 Adelaide112347759180122165711
1994 Adelaide1121352381481485008
1995 Adelaide11111361045451811
1996 Adelaide111826141816173425
Totals22236834301366187190504993

Post-retirement

McGuinness returned to his original club Glenelg as a coach from 1998 to 2000, but had little success, finishing 9th, 4th, and 9th respectively. With the Tigers decimated by injuries in 1998 McGuinness came out of retirement for a game at the age of 34.

Subsequently, he commenced as an assistant coach at Port Adelaide Power AFL side in 2005. He resigned from this position at the end of the 2006 season, citing outside business interests and wanting to spend more time with his family. [5]

McGuinness resigned from the McGuinness-McDermott Foundation on 17 August 2010. [6] He also ran a sports retail business, Rowe and Jarman, which he sold to Amart Sports in 2006.

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1990 SANFL Grand Final

The 1990 SANFL Grand Final was an Australian rules football game contested between the Port Adelaide Football Club and the Glenelg Football Club, held at Football Park on Sunday 7 October 1990. It was the 89th annual Grand Final of the South Australian National Football League, staged to determine the premiers of the 1990 SANFL season.

Neil Davies was an Australian rules footballer who played in four states, but most notably for Glenelg in the South Australian National Football League (SANFL). He also had a stint with Victorian Football League (VFL) club Richmond.

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The history of the Adelaide Football Club dates back to their founding in 1990, when the Australian Football League (AFL) approved a license application by the South Australian National Football League (SANFL) to base a new club out of Adelaide, South Australia in the expanding AFL competition. The club also operates a side in the AFL Women's competition, which held its first season in 2017.

References

  1. These totals refer to premiership matches (home-and-away and finals matches) only.
  2. Main, Jim; Holmesby, Russell (1994). The Encyclopedia of League Footballers. Wilkinson Books AUS. ISBN   1-86350-175-4.
  3. Youtube – First Game Highlights: Crows v Hawks 1991
  4. "Family first in balancing work and life". Sunday Mail (SA). 2 August 2009.
  5. McGuire, Michael (18 August 2010). "Tony McGuinness parts ways with Chris McDermott". The Advertiser . Retrieved 18 August 2010.