Topeka station

Last updated
Topeka, KS
Train and Station, Topeka (9267226612).jpg
A BNSF freight train passes the station (at left) in 2013
Location500 SE Holliday Place
Topeka, KS 66607
Coordinates 39°03′05″N95°39′53″W / 39.0515°N 95.6647°W / 39.0515; -95.6647 Coordinates: 39°03′05″N95°39′53″W / 39.0515°N 95.6647°W / 39.0515; -95.6647
Owned by BNSF Railway
Line(s)BNSF Railway Topeka Subdivision
Platforms1 side platform, 1 island platform
Tracks2
Construction
Disabled accessYes
Other information
Station codeTOP
History
Opened1950
Rebuilt2006
Traffic
Passengers (2016)10,214 [1] Decrease2.svg 1.8%
Services
Preceding station BSicon LOGO Amtrak2.svg Amtrak Following station
Newton
toward Los Angeles
Southwest Chief Lawrence
toward Chicago
Former services
Preceding station BSicon LOGO Amtrak2.svg Amtrak Following station
Emporia
toward Dallas or Houston
Lone Star Lawrence
toward Chicago
Preceding station Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway Following station
Pauline
toward Los Angeles
Main Line Tecumseh
toward Chicago

Topeka is a train station in Topeka, Kansas, United States, served by Amtrak's Southwest Chief train. The station was built in 1950 by the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway as a replacement for the former Topeka Harvey House, which itself was opened in 1878 as part of the original Santa Fe depot and remained open until 1940. [2] The existing station was remodeled by the BNSF Railway in 2006. [3]

Contents

See also

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References

  1. "Amtrak Fact Sheet, FY2016, State of Kansas" (PDF). Amtrak. November 2016. Retrieved 21 February 2017.
  2. Great American Stations - Amtrak(TOP)
  3. Hooper, Michael (June 24, 2006). "Amtrak station renovations unveiled". Topeka Capital-Journal . Archived from the original on September 29, 2007. Retrieved December 31, 2019.