Trischa Zorn

Last updated
Trischa Zorn
Trischa Zorn 3.JPG
Zorn at the 2012 Summer Paralympic Games
Sport
Disability class S12, SB12, SM19
Medal record
Women's para swimming
Representing Flag of the United States.svg  United States
Paralympic Games
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1980 Arnhem 100m backstroke B
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1980 Arnhem 100m butterfly B
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1980 Arnhem 100m freestyle B
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1980 Arnhem 200m individual medley B
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1980 Arnhem 400m individual medley B
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1980 Arnhem 4x100m freestyle relay A-B
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1980 Arnhem 4x100m medley relay A-B
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1984 New York 100m backstroke B2
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1984 New York 100m butterfly B2
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1984 New York 100m freestyle B2
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1984 New York 200m individual medley B2
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1984 New York 400m individual medley B2
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1984 New York 4x100m medley relay B1-B3
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1988 Seoul 50m breaststroke B2
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1988 Seoul 50m freestyle B2
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1988 Seoul 100m backstroke B2
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1988 Seoul 100m breaststroke B2
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1988 Seoul 100m butterfly B2
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1988 Seoul 100m freestyle B2
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1988 Seoul 200m breaststroke B2
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1988 Seoul 200m individual medley B2
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1988 Seoul 400m freestyle B2
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1988 Seoul 400m individual medley B2
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1988 Seoul 4x100m freestyle relay B1-B3
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1988 Seoul 4x100m medley relay B1-B3
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1992 Barcelona 50m freestyle B2
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1992 Barcelona 100m backstroke B2
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1992 Barcelona 100m breaststroke B1-B2
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1992 Barcelona 100m freestyle B2
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1992 Barcelona 200m backstroke B1-B2
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1992 Barcelona 200m breaststroke B1-B3
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1992 Barcelona 200m individual medley B2
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1992 Barcelona 400m individual medley B1-B3
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1992 Barcelona 4x100m freestyle relay B1-B3
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1992 Barcelona 4x100m medley relay B1-B3
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1996 Atlanta 100m backstroke B2
Gold medal icon (G initial).svg 1996 Atlanta 200m individual medley B2
Silver medal icon (S initial).svg 1984 New York 4x100m freestyle relay B1-B3
Silver medal icon (S initial).svg 1992 Barcelona 100m butterfly B2-B3
Silver medal icon (S initial).svg 1992 Barcelona 400m freestyle B2-B3
Silver medal icon (S initial).svg 1996 Atlanta 50m freestyle B2
Silver medal icon (S initial).svg 1996 Atlanta 400m freestyle B2
Silver medal icon (S initial).svg 1996 Atlanta 4×100m medley relay B1-B3
Silver medal icon (S initial).svg 2000 Sydney 100 m backstroke
Silver medal icon (S initial).svg 2000 Sydney 100 m breaststroke
Silver medal icon (S initial).svg 2000 Sydney 100 m butterfly
Silver medal icon (S initial).svg 2000 Sydney 200 m individual medley
Bronze medal icon (B initial).svg 1996 Atlanta 100 m breaststroke
Bronze medal icon (B initial).svg 1996 Atlanta 100 m freestyle
Bronze medal icon (B initial).svg 1996 Atlanta 4 × 100 m freestyle
Bronze medal icon (B initial).svg 2000 Sydney 50 m breaststroke
Bronze medal icon (B initial).svg 2004 Athens 100 m backstroke

Trischa Zorn (born June 1, 1964 in Orange, California) [1] is an American Paralympic swimmer. Blind from birth, she competed in Paralympic swimming (S12, SB12, and SM12 disability categories). [1] She is the most successful athlete in the history of the Paralympic Games, having won 55 medals (41 gold, 9 silver, and 5 bronze), [2] and was inducted into the Paralympic Hall of Fame in 2012. [3] She took the Paralympic Oath for athletes at the 1996 Summer Paralympics in Atlanta. [4]

Contents

Biography

Zorn studied special education at the University of Nebraska and school administration and supervision at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis and law at the IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law. [5]

She competed in the 1980, 1984, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2000 and 2004 Paralympic Games and won a combined total of 55 medals (41 gold, 9 silver, 5 bronze). [1] [2] [6] [7] [8] [9] In the 1996 Games in Atlanta, she won more medals than any other athlete: two gold, three silver and three bronze. She had also topped the individual medal table at the 1992 Paralympic Games in Barcelona, [1] with ten gold medals and two silver. [10] She had won seven gold medals during her first Games in 1980. [11]

After the Sydney Games in 2000, she also held eight world records in her disability category (50 m backstroke, 100 m backstroke, 200 m backstroke, 200 m individual medley, 400 m individual medley, 200 m breaststroke, 4×50 m medley relay, 4×50 m free relay). [12]

On 1 January 2005, Zorn was one of eight athletes honoured during New Year celebrations in Times Square in New York City. The other seven were Ian Thorpe of Australia, Nadia Comăneci of Romania, George Weah of Liberia, Françoise Mbango Etone of Cameroon, Gao Min of China, Félix Sánchez of the Dominican Republic and Bart Conner of the United States. The eight athletes were "centre stage during the festivities in the countdown leading up to ringing in the New Year". [2] In 2012, she was inducted into the International Paralympian Hall of Fame. [13]

Although no longer competing as a swimmer, Zorn works as a legal professional for the Department of Veterans Affairs and lives near Indianapolis, Indiana. [14]

Paralympic medals

The medals without relay races from 1980 Summer Paralympics to 1988 Summer Paralympics, are 46 (32, 9, 5) for IPC. [15] The relay team of United States, in the category of Zorn, won 5 gold and 1 silver in these three Paralympics. The question marks in the infobox refer however to 9 gold medals (not 5 gold and 1 silver medal), this is to confirm the total number of 55 (of which 41 gold), reported in many websites including that of the official IPC in another of his article. [11]

ParalympicsIndividualTeam [16] Total
Gold medal-2008PG.svg Silver medal-2008PG.svg Bronze medal-2008PG.svg Gold medal-2008PG.svg Silver medal-2008PG.svg Bronze medal-2008PG.svg Gold medal-2008PG.svg Silver medal-2008PG.svg Bronze medal-2008PG.svg
1980 Arnhem 500200700
1984 New York 500110610
1988 Seoul 10002001200
1992 Barcelona 8202001020
1996 Atlanta 222011233
2000 Sydney 041000041
2004 Athens 001000001
Total308472137105

See also

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References

  1. 1 2 3 4 "Trischa Zorn's biography". sportsillustrated.cnn.com. Archived from the original on 23 October 2012. Retrieved 12 September 2012.
  2. 1 2 3 "Times Square Honors Athletes". sports-paralympic.netempire.de. 1 January 2005. Archived from the original on 11 November 2013. Retrieved 12 September 2012.
  3. Reid, Hannah. "Paralympic Hall of Famers". Around the Rings. Archived from the original on 2013-11-11. Retrieved 2013-11-11.
  4. Speakers of the Athletes' Oath Archived 2010-06-19 at the Wayback Machine , International Paralympic Committee
  5. "Trischa Zorn-Hudson, '05, Featured in Team USA Story: Law School News: Robert H. McKinney School of Law: IUPUI". IU Robert H. McKinney School of Law. Retrieved 2022-02-09.
  6. "China shine in Paralympic swimming" Archived 2012-10-02 at the Wayback Machine , People's Daily, September 26, 2004
  7. "Top 10 Paralympians who inspire us ahead of Rio 2016". Disability Horizons. 2016-02-22. Retrieved 2020-04-19.
  8. "Great Paralympians Past and Present" Archived 2008-08-20 at the Wayback Machine , About Olympics
  9. "American Trischa Zorn Most Decorated Paralympian of All-Time With 55th Medal" Archived 2012-02-13 at the Wayback Machine , Swimming World Magazine, September 27, 2004.
  10. "Paralympic Summer Games -- Barcelona 1992" Archived 2008-09-06 at the Wayback Machine , official website of the 2008 Beijing Paralympics
  11. 1 2 "Trischa Zorn Wins Fifth Gold", The New York Times , June 23, 1984
  12. "TRISCHA ZORN" Archived 2007-08-21 at the Wayback Machine , International Blind Sport Federation
  13. "IPC Announces Visa Paralympic Hall of Fame Inductees". Archived from the original on 29 August 2012. Retrieved 30 August 2012.
  14. "Swimmer Trischa Zorn's Paralympic Legacy Goes Beyond Her Staggering 55-Medal Haul". Team USA.
  15. "Multi-Medallists". paralympic.org. Archived from the original on 13 September 2012. Retrieved 11 September 2012.
  16. This medal (since 1988), is not counted in the profile of the athlete to the IPC website, because the Paralympics until 1988, in some cases, are not considered members of the relay.