Trouble in the Air

Last updated
Trouble in the Air
Directed by Charles Saunders
Written by
Produced by
  • George Black Jr.
  • Alfred Black
Starring
CinematographyRoy Fogwell
Edited byGraeme Hamilton
Music by Arthur Wilkinson
Production
company
Highbury Productions
Distributed by General Film Distributors
Release date
1 November 1948
Running time
55 minutes
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

Trouble in the Air is a 1948 British comedy film directed by Charles Saunders and starring Freddie Frinton, Jimmy Edwards and Bill Owen. [1] It was made at Highbury Studios as a second feature. The film's sets were designed by the art director Don Russell.

Contents

Synopsis

A BBC broadcaster travels to a small village for a feature on a bell ringing team, but becomes entangled in an attempt by a spiv to cheat an impoverished local landowner. Assisted by the loyal butler the landowner is eventually saved by a football pools win, even if the broadcast turns out to be a disaster.

Cast

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References

  1. Chibnall & MacFarlane p.

Bibliography