Trub Abbey

Last updated
Trub Abbey
Kloster Trub
B-Trub-Ref-Kirche.jpg
The former abbey church
Switzerland adm location map.svg
Red pog.svg
Location within Switzerland
Monastery information
Full name Holy Cross
Order Benedictine
Establishedaround 1128-30
Disestablished1528
People
Founder(s)Thüring von Lützelflüh
Site
Location Trub, Canton of Bern, Switzerland
Coordinates 46°56′35″N7°52′38″E / 46.943150°N 7.877221°E / 46.943150; 7.877221 Coordinates: 46°56′35″N7°52′38″E / 46.943150°N 7.877221°E / 46.943150; 7.877221
Visible remainsabbey church is still active as a Swiss Reformed Church
Public accessthe church is active

Trub Abbey is a former Benedictine monastery in the municipality of Trub in Bern Switzerland

Contents

History

The coat of arms of the Abbey and eventually of the municipality Trub-blason.png
The coat of arms of the Abbey and eventually of the municipality

In 1125 Thüring von Lützelflüh donated land around modern Trub to St. Blaise Abbey in the Black Forest to establish a monk's cell. A few years later, between 1128 and 1130, he was able to separate Trub from St. Blaise and raise it to an independent Abbey. At that time it was dedicated to the Holy Cross. The Abbey's lands and rights, at that time it was recorded as monasterium de Trouba, were confirmed by Pope Innocent II and King Conrad III in 1139. Around 1224 it was known as the convent von Truob. [1]

The secular and military rights over the monastery lands remained with the Lützelflüh family and their descendants, the Freiherren von Brandis until 1455. The rights were then sold to Kaspar von Scharnachtal who held them until his death in 1473, after which they transferred to the city of Bern. During the 13th century, the Abbey forged political ties with Bern and in 1286 its residents became citizens of the city. [1]

The confirmation document of 1139 listed 40 properties that the Abbey owned, including 28 in the Emmental region and 7 in Oberaargau. The remaining five were more distant properties, two vineyards between Cressier and La Neuveville and farm houses in Därligen on Lake Thun, in Entlebuch, Canton of Lucerne and Otelfingen in Zürich. [2] The Abbey buildings grew rapidly over the following years and a Romanesque church was built. Over the following centuries, the Abbey continued to receive or purchase property throughout western Switzerland. Several houses and places in these communities still bear the name Trub from when they were owned by the Abbey. [1]

The village of Trub grew up around the Abbey and was under the low court of the Abbey. However, the high court was under the secular Kyburgs. [3] The Abbey provided chaplains and lay priests to many communities within the Emmental, which they recruited from the local farmers. A total of 24 abbots are known to have presided over the Abbey. In the early years of the Abbey, these abbots came from the minor nobility or the Ministerialis (unfree knights in the service of a feudal overlord) class. After 1400, this changed and the abbots were now former farmers or livestock herders. [1]

In 1414 the mostly wooden Abbey was almost totally destroyed in a fire. It was rebuilt in stone, but in 1501 large parts were destroyed again in a fire. [2] In 1528 Bern accepted the new faith of the Protestant Reformation and secularized all the monasteries in their territory. Most of the Abbey library and its treasures did not survive the two fires and the Reformation. The last abbot of Trub, Heinrich Ruoff, and the remaining nine members residents received a stipend from the Canton to leave the Abbey. The church was converted into a Swiss Reformed parish church. [1] The east and west wings of the Abbey gradually fell into disrepair and were demolished. The south wing was bought by a local farmer and converted into a farm house. The coat of arms of the Abbey became the coat of arms for the municipality of Trub. [2]

See also

Related Research Articles

Abbey of Saint Gall Church in St. Gallen, Switzerland

The Abbey of Saint Gall is a dissolved abbey (747–1805) in a Catholic religious complex in the city of St. Gallen in Switzerland. The Carolingian-era monastery has existed since 719 and became an independent principality between 9th and 13th centuries, and was for many centuries one of the chief Benedictine abbeys in Europe. It was founded by Saint Othmar on the spot where Saint Gall had erected his hermitage. The library of the Abbey is one of the oldest monastic libraries in the world. The city of St. Gallen originated as an adjoining settlement of the abbey. Following the secularization of the abbey around 1800, the former Abbey church became a Cathedral in 1848. Since 1983 the abbey precinct has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Canton of Bern Canton of Switzerland

The canton of Bern or Berne is one of the 26 cantons forming the Swiss Confederation. It is composed of ten districts and its capital city is Bern which is also the federal city of Switzerland. The bear is the heraldic symbol of the canton, displayed on a red-yellow background.

Appenzell Ausserrhoden Canton of Switzerland

Appenzell Ausserrhoden is one of the 26 cantons forming the Swiss Confederation. It is composed of twenty municipalities. The seat of the government and parliament is Herisau, and the seat of judicial authorities are in Trogen. It is traditionally considered a "half-canton", the other half being Appenzell Innerrhoden.

Trub Municipality in Switzerland in Bern

Trub is one of the largest municipalities of Switzerland (62 km²) in size, but not in population. It is located in the Emmental region of the canton of Bern in the administrative district of Emmental.

Engelberg Abbey Benedictine monastery in Engelberg, Canton of Obwalden, Switzerland

Engelberg Abbey is a Benedictine monastery in Engelberg, Canton of Obwalden, Switzerland. It was formerly in the Diocese of Constance, but is now in the Diocese of Chur. It is dedicated to Our Lady of the Angels and occupies a commanding position at the head of the Nidwalden Valley.

Roman Catholic Diocese of Sion

The Diocese of Sion is a Catholic ecclesiastical territory in the canton of Valais, Switzerland. It is the oldest bishopric in the country and one of the oldest north of the Alps. The history of the Bishops of Sion, of the Abbey of St. Maurice of Valais as a whole are inextricably intertwined.

Muri Abbey Benedictine monastery in Muri, Switzerland

Muri Abbey is a Benedictine monastery dedicated to Saint Martin of Tours. It flourished for over eight centuries at Muri, in the Canton of Aargau, near Zürich, Switzerland. It is currently established as Muri-Gries in South Tyrol and was formerly a part of the Austrian-Hungarian Empire.

Rüegsau Municipality in Switzerland in Bern

Rüegsau is a municipality in the administrative district of Emmental in the Swiss canton of Bern.

Murbach Abbey

Murbach Abbey was a famous Benedictine monastery in Murbach, southern Alsace, in a valley at the foot of the Grand Ballon in the Vosges.

Kappel Abbey

Kappel Abbey is a former Cistercian monks monastery located in Kappel am Albis in the Swiss canton of Zurich.

Romainmôtier Priory

Romainmôtier Priory is a former Cluniac priory in the municipality of Romainmôtier-Envy in the canton of Vaud in Switzerland. The monastery was founded by Romanus of Condat, after whom it was named. It is entered on the Swiss inventory of cultural property of national and regional significance.

Aarwangen Castle

Aarwangen Castle is a castle in the municipality of Aarwangen of the canton of Bern in Switzerland. It is a Swiss heritage site of national significance.

Moutier-Grandval Abbey

Moutier-Grandval Abbey was a Benedictine abbey near the villages of Moutier and Grandval in today's Jura bernois administrative district in the canton of Bern in Switzerland. It was founded around 640, when Grandval already existed; Moutier grew up around the abbey.

Saint Urbans Abbey

St. Urban's Abbey is a former Cistercian monastery in the municipality of Pfaffnau in the canton of Lucerne in Switzerland. It is a Swiss heritage site of national significance.

Tänikon Abbey

Tänikon Abbey is a former Cistercian nunnery in the village of Ettenhausen in the municipality of Aadorf in the canton of Thurgau in Switzerland. The former abbey church and the conventual buildings, now Agrotechnorama Tänikon, are both Swiss heritage sites of national significance.

Fraubrunnen Abbey Former Cistercian nunnery in Fraubrunnen, Switzerland

Fraubrunnen Abbey is a former Cistercian nunnery in the municipality of Fraubrunnen in the canton of Bern, Switzerland.

Rüegsau Priory

Rüegsau Priory was a 12th-century Swiss monastery of Benedictine nuns in Rüegsau, in the Canton of Bern. It was dissolved in 1528 as a result of the Reformation in Switzerland.

Toggenburg War Swiss religious war in 1712

The Toggenburg War, also known as the Second War of Villmergen or the Swiss Civil War of 1712, was a Swiss civil war during the Old Swiss Confederacy from 12 April to 11 August 1712. The Catholic "inner cantons" and the Imperial Abbey of Saint Gall fought the Protestant cantons of Bern and Zürich as well as the abbatial subjects of Toggenburg. The conflict was a religious war, a war for hegemony in the Confederacy and an uprising of subjects. The war ended in a Protestant victory and toppled the balance of political power within the Confederacy.

Rüti Reformed Church

Reformierte Kirche Rüti is an Evangelical Reformed church in the Swiss municipality of Rüti in the Canton of Zürich. It was built between 1214 and 1219 AD as the Romanesque style church of the then Premonstratensian Kloster Rüti, an abbey that was founded in 1206 by the House of Regensberg and suppressed in 1525 as part of the Reformation in Zürich.

Churwalden Abbey

Churwalden Abbey is a former Premonstratensian abbey in the municipality of Churwalden, Canton of Graubünden, Switzerland. It was founded around 1150, abandoned after the Protestant Reformation and was formally dissolved in 1803/07. It is a Swiss heritage sites of national significance.

References

  1. 1 2 3 4 5 Trub Monastery in German , French and Italian in the online Historical Dictionary of Switzerland .
  2. 1 2 3 Trub Municipal website-History accessed 6 August 2014 (in German)
  3. Trub in German , French and Italian in the online Historical Dictionary of Switzerland .