Trumpet and Strings

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Trumpet and Strings
Trumpet and Strings.jpg
Studio album by Al Hirt
Released 1962
Genre Jazz
Length32:30
Label RCA Victor
Al Hirt chronology
Horn A-Plenty
(1962)
Trumpet and Strings
(1962)
Honey in the Horn
(1963)
Professional ratings
Review scores
SourceRating
Allmusic Star full.svgStar full.svgStar empty.svgStar empty.svgStar empty.svg [1]

Trumpet and Strings is an album by Al Hirt released on RCA Victor. The album was arranged by Marty Paich. [2]

Album collection of recorded music, words, sounds

An album is a collection of audio recordings issued as a collection on compact disc (CD), vinyl, audio tape, or another medium. Albums of recorded music were developed in the early 20th century as individual 78-rpm records collected in a bound book resembling a photograph album; this format evolved after 1948 into single vinyl LP records played at ​33 13 rpm. Vinyl LPs are still issued, though album sales in the 21st-century have mostly focused on CD and MP3 formats. The audio cassette was a format used alongside vinyl from the 1970s into the first decade of the 2000s.

Al Hirt American trumpeter and bandleader

Alois Maxwell "Al" Hirt was an American trumpeter and bandleader. He is best remembered for his million-selling recordings of "Java" and the accompanying album Honey in the Horn (1963), and for the theme music to The Green Hornet. His nicknames included "Jumbo" and "The Round Mound of Sound". Colin Escott, an author of musician biographies, wrote that RCA Victor Records, for which Hirt had recorded most of his best-selling recordings and for which he had spent much of his professional recording career, had dubbed him with another moniker: "The King." Hirt was inducted into The Louisiana Music Hall of Fame in November 2009.

RCA Records is an American record label owned by Sony Music, a subsidiary of Sony Corporation of America. It is one of Sony Music's four flagship labels, alongside RCA's former long-time rival Columbia Records, Arista Records, and Epic Records. The label has released multiple genres of music, including pop, classical, rock, hip hop, electronic, R&B, blues, jazz, and country. Its name is derived from the initials of its defunct parent company, the Radio Corporation of America (RCA). It was fully acquired by Bertelsmann in 1986, making it a part of Bertelsmann Music Group (BMG); however, RCA Records became a part of Sony BMG Music Entertainment, a merger between BMG and Sony Music, in 2004, and was acquired by the latter in 2008, after the dissolution of Sony BMG and the restructuring of Sony Music. It is the second oldest record label in American history, after sister label Columbia Records.

Contents

The album landed on the Billboard 200 chart in 1962, reaching #96. [3]

The Billboard 200 is a record chart ranking the 200 most popular music albums and EPs in the United States. It is published weekly by Billboard magazine. It is frequently used to convey the popularity of an artist or groups of artists. Often, a recording act will be remembered by its "number ones", those of their albums that outperformed all others during at least one week. The chart grew from a weekly top 10 list in 1956 to become a top 200 in May 1967, and acquired its present title in March 1992. Its previous names include the Billboard Top LPs (1961–72), Billboard Top LPs & Tape (1972–84), Billboard Top 200 Albums (1984–85) and Billboard Top Pop Albums.

Track listing

  1. "Stranger in Paradise" (Robert Wright, George Forrest)
  2. "Poor Butterfly" (Raymond Hubbell, John Golden)
  3. "Fools Rush In" (Johnny Mercer, Rube Bloom)
  4. "Sleepy Lagoon" (Eric Coates, Jack Lawrence)
  5. "As Time Goes By" (Herman Hupfeld)
  6. "East of the Sun" (Brooks Bowman)
  7. "Sleepless Hours" (Albert VanDam)
  8. "True Love" (Cole Porter)
  9. "I'll Never Smile Again" (Ruth Lowe)
  10. "I Cried for You" (Gus Arnheim, Arthur Freed, Abe Lyman)
  11. "How Deep Is the Ocean?" (Irving Berlin)
  12. "Easy to Love" (Cole Porter)

Chart positions

Chart (1962)Peak
position
Billboard Top LPs 96

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References