Trust Me (short story collection)

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Trust Me

Trust Me.jpg

first edition cover
Author John Updike
Country United States
Language English
Publisher Alfred A. Knopf
Publication date
1987
Media type Print (hardcover)
Pages 302pp (first edition)

Trust Me is a collection of short stories by John Updike, first published in 1987. [1]

Short story Brief work of literature, usually written in narrative prose

A short story is a piece of prose fiction that typically can be read in one sitting and focuses on a self-contained incident or series of linked incidents, with the intent of evoking a "single effect" or mood, however there are many exceptions to this.

John Updike American novelist, poet, short story writer, art critic, and literary critic

John Hoyer Updike was an American novelist, poet, short-story writer, art critic, and literary critic. One of only three writers to win the Pulitzer Prize for Fiction more than once, Updike published more than twenty novels, more than a dozen short-story collections, as well as poetry, art and literary criticism and children's books during his career.

List of stories

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References

  1. Robinson, Marilynne (April 26, 1987), "At Play in the Backyard of the Psyche", The New York Times , p. Sec. 7, p. 1, col. 1