United Nations Security Council Resolution 547

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UN Security Council
Resolution 547
DurbanSign1989.jpg
Apartheid-era sign (1989)
Date13 January 1984
Meeting no.2,512
CodeS/RES/547 (Document)
SubjectSouth Africa
Voting summary
15 voted for
None voted against
None abstained
ResultAdopted
Security Council composition
Permanent members
Non-permanent members

United Nations Security Council resolution 547, adopted unanimously on 13 January 1984, after reaffirming previous resolutions on the topic, the Council expressed its concern at the death sentences issued to Malesela Benjamin Maloise, a member of the African National Congress.

A United Nations Security Council resolution is a UN resolution adopted by the fifteen members of the Security Council; the UN body charged with "primary responsibility for the maintenance of international peace and security".

Capital punishment, also known as the death penalty, is a government-sanctioned practice whereby a person is killed by the state as a punishment for a crime. The sentence that someone be punished in such a manner is referred to as a death sentence, whereas the act of carrying out the sentence is known as an execution. Crimes that are punishable by death are known as capital crimes, capital offences or capital felonies, and they commonly include serious offences such as murder, mass murder, aggravated cases of rape, child rape, child sexual abuse, terrorism, treason, espionage, offences against the State, such as attempting to overthrow government, piracy, aircraft hijacking, drug trafficking and drug dealing, war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide, and in some cases, the most serious acts of recidivism, aggravated robbery, and kidnapping, but may include a wide range of offences depending on a country. Etymologically, the term capital in this context alluded to execution by beheading.

African National Congress Political party in South Africa

The African National Congress (ANC) is the Republic of South Africa's governing political party. It has been the ruling party of post-apartheid South Africa since the election of Nelson Mandela in the 1994 election, winning every election since then. Cyril Ramaphosa, the incumbent President of South Africa, has served as leader of the ANC since 18 December 2017.

Contents

The resolution called upon the South African authorities to commute the sentences imposed on Mr Maloise, and urged all other Member States and organisations to help save the life of the man. Maloise, a black poet, was convicted of murdering a policeman. Despite a court ruling that Maloise was under heavy psychological pressure at the time, President Pieter Willem Botha ordered his execution. On 18 October 1985, Maloise was hanged in Pretoria Central Prison. [1]

Pretoria Central Prison, renamed Kgosi Mampuru II Management Area by President Jacob Zuma on 13 April 2013 and sometimes referred to as Kgosi Mampuru II Correctional Services is a large prison in central Pretoria, within the City of Tshwane in South Africa. It is operated by the South African Department of Correctional Services.

See also

United Nations Security Council Resolution 503 United Nations Security Council resolution

United Nations Security Council resolution 503, adopted unanimously on 9 April 1982, after reaffirming Resolution 473 (1980), the Council expressed its concern at the death sentences issued by the Transvaal Provincial Division of the Supreme Court of South Africa against Ncimbithi Johnson Lubisi, Petrus Tsepo Mashigo and Naphtali Manana, all of whom were members of the African National Congress.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 525 United Nations Security Council resolution

United Nations Security Council resolution 525, adopted unanimously on 7 December 1982, after hearing of the death sentences on Anthony Tsotsobe, Johannes Shabangu and David Moise, the Council expressed its concern at the sentences passed by the Supreme Court of Appeal of South Africa, in addition to those of Ncimbithi Johnson Lubisi, Petrus Tsepo Mashigo and Naphtali Manana, members of the African National Congress.

United Nations Security Council resolution 533, adopted unanimously on 7 June 1983, after reaffirming Resolution 525 (1982), the Council expressed its concern at the death sentences issued to Thelle Simon Mogoerane, Jerry Semano Mosololi and Marcus Thabo Motaung, all members of the African National Congress.

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References

  1. Freudenheim, Milt; Giniger, Henry; Levine, Richard (20 October 1985). "The toll rises in South Africa". The New York Times.