Wake County Board of Commissioners

Last updated

The Wake County Board of Commissioners is the governing board for Wake County, which includes the City of Raleigh.

Contents

As of the 2010 census, the population of Wake County was 900,993 [1] making it North Carolina's second most populated county. Its county seat is Raleigh, which is also the state capital. Wake County is part of the Research Triangle metropolitan region, which encompasses the cities of Raleigh, Durham, Cary and Chapel Hill and their surrounding suburban areas. The regional name originated after the 1959 creation of the Research Triangle Park, located midway between Raleigh and Durham. The Research Triangle region encompasses the U.S. Census Bureau's Combined Statistical Area (CSA) of Raleigh-Durham-Cary. The estimated population of the Raleigh-Durham-Cary CSA was 1,749,525 as of April 1, 2010, with the Raleigh-Cary Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) portion at 1,130,490 residents in 2010 census.

Wake County was the 9th fastest growing county in the United States, with the Town of Cary and the City of Raleigh being the 8th and 15th fastest growing cities, respectively. [2] It is presided over by the County Board Chairman.

Composition

AffiliationMembers
  Democratic Party 7
  Republican Party 0
 Total
7

Current commissioners

This is a list of the Wake County Commissioners in order by district. This list is current as of December 2018.

DistrictCommissionerIn office sinceParty
1stSig Hutchinson2014Democratic
2ndMatt Calabria2014Democratic
3rdJessica Holmes2014Democratic
4thSusan Evans2018Democratic
5thJames West2010 (Appointed) [3] Democratic
6thGreg Ford2016Democratic
7thVickie Adamson2018Democratic

Former commissioners

Below is a list of notable former members of the Wake County Board of Commissioners with their dates of service:

Related Research Articles

Raleigh, North Carolina Capital of North Carolina

Raleigh is the capital of the state of North Carolina and the seat of Wake County in the United States. Raleigh is the second-largest city in the state, after Charlotte. Raleigh is known as the "City of Oaks" for its many oak trees, which line the streets in the heart of the city. The city covers a land area of 142.8 square miles (370 km2). The U.S. Census Bureau estimated the city's population as 474,069 as of July 1, 2019. It is one of the fastest-growing cities in the country. The city of Raleigh is named after Sir Walter Raleigh, who established the lost Roanoke Colony in present-day Dare County.

Wake County, North Carolina U.S. county in North Carolina

Wake County is a county in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of July 1, 2019, the population was 1,111,761, making it North Carolina's most populous county as well as the most populous county in the Carolinas. From July 2005 to July 2006, Wake County was the 9th fastest-growing county in the United States, with the town of Cary and the city of Raleigh being the 8th and 15th fastest-growing cities, respectively.

Durham County, North Carolina U.S. county in North Carolina

Durham County is a county located in the U.S. state of North Carolina. As of the 2010 census, the population was 267,587, making it the sixth-most populous county in North Carolina. Its county seat is Durham.

Apex, North Carolina Town in North Carolina, United States

Apex is a town in Wake County, North Carolina, United States. Apex encompasses the community of Friendship at its southern border. In 1994, the downtown area was designated a historic district, and the Apex train depot, built in 1867, is designated a Wake County landmark. The depot location marks the highest point on the old Chatham Railroad, hence the town's name. The town motto is "The Peak of Good Living".

Knightdale, North Carolina Town in North Carolina, United States

Knightdale is a town in Wake County, North Carolina, United States. As of the 2010 census, the population was 11,401. The U.S. Census Bureau estimates the town's population to be 17,843 as of July 1, 2019. Knightdale's population grew 10.4% from 2010-2013, making it the second fastest-growing community in the Research Triangle region for that time period.

Wake Forest, North Carolina Town in North Carolina, United States

Wake Forest is a town in Franklin and Wake counties in the U.S. state of North Carolina; located almost entirely in Wake County, it lies just north of the state capital, Raleigh. The population was 30,117 at the 2010 census, up from 12,588 at the 2000 census. The U.S. Census Bureau estimates the city's population to be 45,629 as of July 1, 2019. In 2007, the town was listed by Forbes magazine as the 20th fastest growing suburb in America, with a 73.2 percent increase in population between 2000 and 2006. Wake Forest was the original home of Wake Forest University for 122 years before it moved to Winston-Salem in 1956.

Mebane, North Carolina City in North Carolina, United States

Mebane is a city located mostly in Alamance County, North Carolina, United States, and partly in Orange County, North Carolina. The town was named for Alexander Mebane, an American Revolutionary War general and member of the U.S. Congress. It was incorporated as "Mebanesville" in 1881, and in 1883 the name was changed to "Mebane". It was incorporated as a city in 1987. The population as of the 2010 census was 11,393. Mebane is one of the fastest growing municipalities in North Carolina. Mebane straddles the Research Triangle and Piedmont Triad Regions of North Carolina. The Alamance County portion is part of the Burlington Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is a component of the Greensboro-Winston-Salem-High Point Combined Statistical Area. The Orange County portion is part of the Durham-Chapel Hill Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is a component of the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill Combined Statistical Area.

Cary, North Carolina Place in North Carolina, United States

Cary is the seventh-largest municipality in North Carolina. Cary is predominantly in Wake County, with a small area in Chatham County in the U.S. state of North Carolina and is the county's second-largest municipality, as well as the third-largest municipality in The Triangle of North Carolina after Raleigh and Durham.

Durham, North Carolina City in North Carolina, United States

Durham (/ˈdʌrəm/) is a city in and the county seat of Durham County in the U.S. state of North Carolina. Small portions of the city limits extend into Orange County and Wake County. The U.S. Census Bureau estimated the city's population to be 278,993 as of July 1, 2019, making it the 4th-most populous city in North Carolina, and the 79th-most populous city in the United States. The city is located in the east-central part of the Piedmont region along the Eno River. Durham is the core of the four-county Durham-Chapel Hill Metropolitan Area, which has a population of 542,710 as of U.S. Census 2014 Population Estimates. The Office of Management and Budget also includes Durham as a part of the Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill Combined Statistical Area, commonly known as the Research Triangle, which has a population of 2,037,430 as of U.S. Census 2014 Population Estimates.

Morrisville, North Carolina Town in North Carolina, United States

Morrisville is a town located primarily in Wake County, North Carolina. The population was 18,576 at the 2010 census. The U.S. Census Bureau estimates the town's population to be 28,846 as of July 1, 2019. Morrisville is part of the Research Triangle metropolitan region. The regional name originated after the 1959 creation of the Research Triangle Park, located midway between the cities of Raleigh and Durham. The Research Triangle region encompasses the U.S. Census Bureau's Combined Statistical Area (CSA) of Raleigh-Durham-Cary. The estimated population of the Raleigh-Durham-Cary CSA was 1,565,223 as of July 1, 2006, with the Raleigh-Cary Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) portion estimated at 994,551 residents. The headquarters of multinational Lenovo are located in the municipal limits.

Research Triangle Geographic region of North Carolina, U.S.

The Research Triangle, commonly referred to as simply The Triangle, is a region in the Piedmont of North Carolina in the United States, anchored by three major research universities: North Carolina State University, Duke University, and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, as well as the cities of Raleigh and Durham and the town of Chapel Hill. The nine-county region, officially named the Raleigh–Durham–Cary combined statistical area (CSA), comprises the Raleigh–Cary and Durham–Chapel Hill Metropolitan Statistical Areas and the Henderson Micropolitan Statistical Area.

The Research Triangle Regional Public Transportation Authority, known as GoTriangle, provides regional bus service to the Research Triangle region of North Carolina in Wake, Durham, and Orange counties. The GoTriangle name was adopted in 2015 as part of the consolidated GoTransit branding scheme for the Triangle.

Cedar Fork Township, Wake County, North Carolina township in Wake County, North Carolina

Cedar Fork Township is one of twenty townships within Wake County, North Carolina. As of the 2010 census, Cedar Fork Township had a population of 40,841, a 274.3% increase over 2000.

GoRaleigh

GoRaleigh is the transit system responsible for operating most of the public transportation services in Raleigh, North Carolina. The system operates 27 fixed routes throughout the city's municipal area and also operates five regional/express routes in partnership with GoTriangle, the regional provider. GoRaleigh is contracted to operate two additional routes, an express route to the Wake Tech Community College campus south of Raleigh and a local circulator service in the Town of Wake Forest. Capital Area Transit, also known as CAT, was rebranded to GoRaleigh in 2015 under the consolidated GoTransit, a joint branding of municipal and regional transit systems for the Greater Raleigh Metropolitan Region.

The 4th congressional district of North Carolina is located in the central region of the state. The district includes part of Wake County,, all of Orange County,, and a small sliver of southern Durham County.

Piedmont Crescent

The Piedmont Crescent, also known as the Piedmont Urban Crescent, is a large, polycentric urbanized region in the U.S. state of North Carolina that forms the northern section of the rapidly developing Piedmont Atlantic megalopolis, a conurbation also known as the "I-85 Boombelt", which extends from the Raleigh area ) to Atlanta, Georgia in the southeastern United States.

Black River Township, Harnett County, North Carolina township in Harnett County, North Carolina

Black River Township is one of thirteen townships in Harnett County, North Carolina, United States. The township had a population of 8,085 according to the 2000 census. It is a part of the Dunn Micropolitan Area, which is also a part of the greater Raleigh–Durham–Cary Combined Statistical Area (CSA) as defined by the United States Census Bureau.

Buckhorn Township, Harnett County, North Carolina township in Harnett County, North Carolina

Buckhorn Township is one of thirteen townships in Harnett County, North Carolina, United States. The township had a population of 1,905 according to the 2000 census. It is a part of the Dunn Micropolitan Area, which is also a part of the greater Raleigh–Durham–Cary Combined Statistical Area (CSA) as defined by the United States Census Bureau.

Demographics of North Carolina covers the varieties of ethnic groups who reside in North Carolina and relevant trends.

Charlotte metropolitan area Metropolitan area in the United States

The Charlotte metropolitan area is a metropolitan area of North and South Carolina within and surrounding the city of Charlotte, North Carolina. Located in the Piedmont, it is the largest metropolitan area in the Carolinas, and the fifth largest in the Southeastern United States behind the Miami metropolitan area, Atlanta metropolitan area, Tampa Bay Area, and Orlando metropolitan area.

References

  1. United States Census Bureau. "2010 Census Data"
  2. Retrieved May 27, 2010
  3. Carag, Diana (15 September 2010). "Wake Co. Democrats Nominate Webb's Replacement". NBC-17. Retrieved 29 December 2011.

Stan Norwalk (2008-2010)