Watkins Point Farm

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Watkins Point Farm
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Location 27737 Phoenix Church Road, Marion Station, Maryland
Coordinates 37°58′51″N75°47′28″W / 37.98083°N 75.79111°W / 37.98083; -75.79111 Coordinates: 37°58′51″N75°47′28″W / 37.98083°N 75.79111°W / 37.98083; -75.79111
Area 0.5 acres (0.20 ha)
Built 1780 (1780)
Architectural style Federal, Greek Revival
NRHP reference # 02001586 [1]
Added to NRHP December 27, 2002

Watkins Point Farm, also known as the James L. Horsey Farm and John T. Adams Farm, is a historic home located at Marion Station, Somerset County, Maryland. It is a three-part frame and sawn log dwelling. The one-room plan sawn log house was erected around 1780-90 and is extended to the west by a single-story, mid-19th century hyphen that connects the two-story, transverse-hall plan main block, erected around 1850. The interiors retain large portions of original woodwork. Also on the property is a 20th-century rusticated-block potato house. [2]

Marion Station, Maryland Unincorporated community in Maryland, United States

Marion Station, also known as Marion, is an unincorporated community in Somerset County, Maryland, United States. It is located at the northern intersection of Maryland Route 413 and Maryland Route 667. After the arrival of the Pennsylvania Railroad arm known as the "Eastern Shore Railroad" toward Crisfield in 1866, Marion was locally hailed as the "strawberry capital of the world". After the trains stopped coming it has gone into decline, with some sources even hailing it as a ghost town.

Somerset County, Maryland County in the United States

Somerset County is the southernmost county in the U.S. state of Maryland. As of the 2010 census, the population was 26,470. making it the second-least populous county in Maryland. The county seat is Princess Anne.

Maryland State of the United States of America

Maryland is a state in the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States, bordering Virginia, West Virginia, and the District of Columbia to its south and west; Pennsylvania to its north; and Delaware to its east. The state's largest city is Baltimore, and its capital is Annapolis. Among its occasional nicknames are Old Line State, the Free State, and the Chesapeake Bay State. It is named after the English queen Henrietta Maria, known in England as Queen Mary.

It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2002. [1]

National Register of Historic Places federal list of historic sites in the United States

The National Register of Historic Places (NRHP) is the United States federal government's official list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects deemed worthy of preservation for their historical significance. A property listed in the National Register, or located within a National Register Historic District, may qualify for tax incentives derived from the total value of expenses incurred preserving the property.

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References

  1. 1 2 National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places . National Park Service.
  2. Paul Baker Touart (May 2002). "National Register of Historic Places Registration: Watkins Point Farm" (PDF). Maryland Historical Trust. Retrieved 2016-03-01.